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dc.contributor.advisorJumbe Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFredrick Tamoohen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJudith Okelloen_US
dc.contributor.authorCherono, Kuloba Shawlet
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-16T09:59:31Z
dc.date.available2022-08-16T09:59:31Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/23916
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Master of Science (Aquatic Ecology) in the School of Pure and Applied Sciences of Kenyatta University, June, 2022en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study examined the influence of Umba River, a trans-boundary resource draining approximately 16 million m3 of freshwater into the Indian Ocean, on the distribution and root morphology of mangrove of Vanga. Mangroves of Vanga, situated a few kilometers from the border that transverse the Kenya-Tanzania border, south coast of Kenya, harbor countless marine and coastal biodiversity and contributes to the socioeconomics wellbeing of the adjacent communities. This ecological survey aimed at understanding the influence of the river on sediment surface elevation change, physicochemical parameters, and the resultant effect on mangrove distribution and root morphology. Sixty-three plots were sampled along twenty-two belt transects laid perpendicular to the river within three forest blocks (A, B and C) representing landward, midstream and seaward sites respectively. Highest mangrove stem density (3268±325 stem/ha) was recorded seaward at relatively lower burial levels (2.69±0.49 cm) and relatively high salinity (30.09±13.85). Nutrient concentration was relatively low across all study blocks but mainly dominated by ammonia (70%), signifying hypoxia in sediment. Among the three blocks, Avicennia marina recorded the largest number (242±45/m2) and longest (>15 cm) pneumatophores in the landward block. The difference in the height of Rhizophora mucronata prop roots was however not significant within the blocks. These findings suggest that sediment elevation change had the most influence on mangrove. Increase in sediment deposition influenced mangrove distribution, species zonation and root morphology, with high stem density being recorded at lower burial levels and species demonstrating a specific range of tolerance to related environmental variables. In addition, mangrove complex root system, depending on species, may adjust to cope with the increasing sedimentation. It is therefore important to use these findings to inform the development and management of the proposed Kenya-Tanzania Transboundary Conservation Area (TBCA).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectEffectsen_US
dc.subjectUmba River Sedimentationen_US
dc.subjectDistributionen_US
dc.subjectRoot Morphologyen_US
dc.subjectMangrovesen_US
dc.subjectVangaen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleEffects of Umba River Sedimentation on the Distribution and Root Morphology of Mangroves of Vanga, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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