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dc.contributor.authorNwoye, A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-30T08:58:07Z
dc.date.available2014-05-30T08:58:07Z
dc.date.issued2005-09
dc.identifier.citationAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy Volume 26, Issue 3, pages 147–154, September 2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/9718
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1002/j.1467-8438.2005.tb00662.xen_US
dc.description.abstractWestern literatures on bereavement acknowledge the tendency to pathological grieving among some bereaved persons. The phenomenon of pathological mourning, however, is rare in Africa because of the presence of coherent and transformative rituals of mourning. This article argues that such rituals and performative experiences heal by addressing four principal aspects of the memory of the bereaved individual. The article elaborates on the content, process, symbolic meanings and clinical potency of these rituals.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherwileyen_US
dc.titleMemory Healing Processes and Community Intervention in Grief Work in Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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