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dc.contributor.authorTei, Jilo Naghea
dc.contributor.authorWaswa, Fuchaka
dc.date.accessioned2024-03-11T08:15:17Z
dc.date.available2024-03-11T08:15:17Z
dc.date.issued2024
dc.identifier.citationTei, J. N., & Waswa, F. (2024). Climate Smart Agriculture and its Implication on Climate Change Adaptation Measures within Smallholder Farming Systems in Gatundu South, Kenya. Journal of the Kenya National Commission for UNESCO, 4(1). https://doi.org/10.62049/jkncu.v4i1.49en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.62049/jkncu.v4i1.49
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/27731
dc.descriptionArticleen_US
dc.description.abstractThe impacts of climate change and the need for implementing adaptation and mitigation measures continues to dominate global environmental dialogue, with the Africa Climate Summit 2023 and Conference of Parties 28 being the most recent in this series. A hitherto marginalised aspect is the level of adoption of climate-smart agriculture practices in smallholder production systems. This study explored this dimension using Gatundu South as a case study. Rainfall data was obtained from the Climate Hazards Group Infrared Precipitation with Station data. Socio-economic data targeting 384 respondents was collected using questionnaires. Standard procedures were used to analyse these data. Results showed that farmers are generally aware of climatic variability especially as evidenced by changes in rainfall patterns. Farmers adapt and attempt to mitigate effects of climate change and variability by using practices that deliver direct economic benefits and not necessarily the climate-smartness of the practices. Farmers did not associate their adaptation measures with the need to reduce emission of greenhouse gasses. To smallholder farmers, direct economic benefits are the primary incentives for the adoption of climate-smart practices. Further, the link between climate change and the invisible greenhouse gases is a knowledge gap among smallholder farmers. Therefore, adoption of climate smart agriculture practices can be enhanced if the narrative shifts to emphasise the negative contribution of greenhouse gases to farmers’ health and the concomitant medical costs, through their role in exacerbating air pollutionen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUNESCOen_US
dc.subjectClimate Smart Agricultureen_US
dc.subjectAdaptation Measuresen_US
dc.subjectSmallholder Farmersen_US
dc.titleClimate Smart Agriculture and its Implication on Climate Change Adaptation Measures within Smallholder Farming Systems in Gatundu South, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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