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dc.contributor.advisorXavier Francis Ichanien_US
dc.contributor.authorGachanja, Hosea Karanja
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-07T08:56:34Z
dc.date.available2024-02-07T08:56:34Z
dc.date.issued2023-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/27586
dc.descriptionA Research Project Submitted to the School of Law, Arts and Social Sciences in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy of Kenyatta University, November 2023.en_US
dc.description.abstractMilitary logistics continues to attract the attention of researchers and policymakers alike. This research project aimed to examine the logistics implications on operational outcomes of the Kenya Defense Forces' involvement in Somalia between 2012 and 2022. The study focused on analyzing the forms of logistics support services provided by the military, analyzing the operational logistics challenges encountered, evaluating the effectiveness of adopted strategies, and to assess the contributions of the operations to logistic support readiness in peace support operations. To anchor the analysis of logistical support, the study drew guidance from liberalism theory and logistic theory by applying them to various aspects of the research. The target population included mission commodity suppliers, supply and logistics officers, military personnel, civilian police, and civilian staff who served in Somalia operations. Randomized, purposive, and snowball sampling techniques were used to obtain the sample size of respondents. The study utilized three data collection tools: questionnaires, interview guides, and focused discussion guides. Qualitative data was analyzed using simple descriptive statistics and presented in tables, pie charts, and bar graphs. Quantitative data was analyzed thematically through content analysis and thematic reflection. The study involved 103 participants from the Kenya Defense Forces (KDF) and other stakeholders and revealed valuable insights into the operational logistics support during the military intervention in Somalia. Key findings include: the types of logistic support provided were transport services, equipment acquisition and supply, medical services, casualty evacuation, maintenance and repair of armor and equipment Approximately 58.3% of the respondents were in agreement on the effective execution of personnel transportation, 46.6% agreement on efficient facility management and acquisition of services, and 48.5% agreement on the positive impact of medical and health support. However, challenges were identified, with 48.5% agreeing on difficulties in transporting equipment, arsenal and rations, 72.8% acknowledging supply chain management hurdles, and 79.6% recognizing poor technological infrastructure among others. The study also highlighted the need for better logistical department responsiveness (62.1% agreement) and the constant threat from the enemy affecting logistics (73.8% agreement). Assessing operational logistics strategies, 43.7% strongly agreed on technology infrastructure improvements, and 53.4% agreed on the effectiveness of substantial transportation investment. However, mixed perceptions were found for storage facilities (51.5% agreement) and inventory control (48.5% agreement). This study will also be useful in providing logistical information on matters pertaining to international relations in the study of peacekeeping operations. Policymakers and military planners can utilize these findings to enhance the effectiveness of future military interventions by addressing challenges and building on effective strategies to improve logistical readiness and performance of the military.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectLogistics Implicationsen_US
dc.subjectMilitary Interventionsen_US
dc.subjectKenya Defence Forces Contigentsen_US
dc.subjectSomaliaen_US
dc.subject2012 – 2022en_US
dc.titleLogistics Implications on Military Interventions: A Case of the Kenya Defence Forces Contigents in Somalia 2012 – 2022en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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