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dc.contributor.authorKiprono, Cheruiyot Paul
dc.contributor.authorKalekye, Musyoki Geraldine
dc.contributor.authorWafula, Otiato Justus
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-30T07:40:52Z
dc.date.available2024-01-30T07:40:52Z
dc.date.issued2024-01
dc.identifier.citationKiprono, C. P., Kalekye, M. G., & Wafula, O. J. (2024). Implications of Gender Relations on Forest Management among the Indigenous Ogiek of Mau Forest in Nakuru County, Kenya. Open Journal of Social Sciences, 12(01), 127-147.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.4236/jss.2024.121009
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/27329
dc.descriptionArticleen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed at interrogating the implications of gender relations among indigenous Ogiek on management of Mau Forest in Nakuru County, Kenya to guide gender mainstreaming in forest management. The study employed cultural ecofeminist theory which captures relationship between women and the earth, comparing how women and nature are subordinated by men in patriarchal society. The study used descriptive survey study design, with sampling arrangement involving purposive and systematic random sampling methods to choose seventy-four respondents from the community forest associations (CFAs) within the Mau ecosystem. Data from the indigenous Ogiek residents were collected using questionnaires while key-in-depth interview schedule was used to collect data from Ogiek village elders, Kenya Forest Service Officers, and area chief. Test-retest method was used to test reliability of research instruments. Quantitative data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data was analysed establishing patterns, categories, and themes. The findings showed that there exists traditional gender division of labour underprivileged by Ogiek patriarchal social structure which influences forest management among indigenous Ogiek of Mau Forest. The findings further revealed that the forest legal framework in Kenya especially the Kenya Constitution 2010, Forest Policy 2014 and Forest Act 2016 are gender blind. Further, Community Forests Associations face gender equality deficit in representation where indigenous Ogiek women are subordinated due to cultural setup of Ogiek which prioritises men over women in leadership. The study recommends that the indigenous Ogiek women should be sensitized to join and actively be part of the CFAs. Forest empowerment interventions should consider gender roles which constrain indigenous Ogiek women from participating in forest reform activities. Lastly, CFAs institute measures on equality in forest resource exploitation and benefits sharing while alive to cultural constraints affecting indigenous Ogiek men and womenen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJSSen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectForest Managementen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Ogieken_US
dc.subjectCommunity Forest Associationen_US
dc.titleImplications of Gender Relations on Forest Management among the Indigenous Ogiek of Mau Forest in Nakuru County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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