Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRotich, Jonathan Kimtai
dc.contributor.authorRintaugu, Elijah Gitonga
dc.contributor.authorThangu, Edna
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-23T10:25:43Z
dc.date.available2023-03-23T10:25:43Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationROTİCH, J., RINTAUGU, E., & THANGU, E. (2023). Anti-Doping Knowledge, Attitude, and Experience of General Practitioners in Kenya. Spor Bilimleri Araştırmaları Dergisi, 8(1), 79-98.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2548-0723
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/25000
dc.descriptionArticleen_US
dc.description.abstractGeneral practitioners are regarded as athletic support personnel as they are involved in delivering supportive services such as treating athletes participating in or preparing for sports competitions. General practitioners play a vital role in influencing athletes to fulfill their mandate to adhere to clean sports and therefore, their additional knowledge in sports is required to comprehensively address their health needs without affecting the integrity of rules that govern fair play. General practitioners require sufficient doping knowledge to provide athletes with health needs consistent with anti-doping regulations. In Kenya, no studies have investigated or reported the doping knowledge, attitude or experience of General Practitioners, thus leaving a knowledge gap on their ability to treat competitive athletes harmonious with WADA requirements. Therefore, the study sought to unearth General Practitioners' doping knowledge, attitude, and experience in Kenya. The study's findings have implications on doping knowledge, attitude, and experience of Kenya General Practitioners’ essential to inform the current status of the concept. A cross-sectional analytical study design was selected because of its robustness in describing general practitioners' current doping knowledge, attitude, and experiences. Data was collected using a self-reported and validated questionnaire where 250 General practitioners completed the survey. Findings revealed that Kenyan general practitioners are well aware of doping regulatory agencies of WADA and ADAK. The findings demonstrated that General Practitioners had an average doping knowledge (47.77 ± 14.03) punctuated with limited knowledge of prohibited substances, methods, and substances in certain sports. Work experience significantly influenced General Practitioners knowledge, F (4,245) = 10.852, p< .001. General Practitioners had a negative doping attitude of 45.23 ± 13.64. As many as 22% (55) General Practitioners received doping requests for the last 12 months, where 35.7% (89) of requests are about drugs to aid recovery. Anabolic steroids, corticosteroids, and peptide hormones were among the most sought-after PEDs. General Practitioners in Kenya have inadequate doping knowledge, which could limit their efficacy in treating professional athletes in line with WADA guidelines. Additional anti-doping training could benefit them address this limitation. Although General Practitioners demonstrated a negative attitude, expanding their involvement through active participation in doping seminars, and programs can enhance their understanding of the doping concept necessary to develop and maintain a strong negative attitudeen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWorld Anti-Doping Agencyen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Sport Sciences Researchen_US
dc.subjectDoping attitudeen_US
dc.subjectGeneral practitioneren_US
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_US
dc.subjectDoping regulation in Kenyaen_US
dc.subjectDoping experienceen_US
dc.titleAnti-Doping Knowledge, Attitude, and Experience of General Practitioners in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record