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dc.contributor.advisorPeter Wafula Wekesaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPius Kaikai Wanyonyien_US
dc.contributor.authorAndanje, Indeche Fridah
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-06T08:32:27Z
dc.date.available2022-04-06T08:32:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/23514
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the School of Humanities and Social Sciences in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Award of a Degree of Master of Arts in History Kenyatta University, July 2021en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the transformation in land-use patterns among the Kabras of Kakamega North Sub-County of Kakamega County between 1963 and 2010.The initiatives and the struggle of the Kabras for the betterment of their economic status through the application of various land-use patterns is at the core of this study. The research examined and analysed various land-use patterns adopted by the Kabras of Kakamega North Sub-County at independence. It also investigated the emerging trends that dominated Kabras system of land-use between 1963 and 1978. The study focused on establishing the causes of these changes and their impact on the Kabras livelihoods between 1979 and 2010. Other studies carried out on the Kabras have been pegged on other aspects of the Kabras’ livelihood other than land-use system. The need to fill this gap is what necessitated having this study. The year 1978 is viewed as a watershed in which a comparison is taken between president Kenyatta’s and president Moi’s periods of leadership on how land was utilized by the Kabras. The theory of articulation of modes of production is an analytical perspective which conceives modes of production as an abstraction which links the material realities to the society in which they occur. This theory, therefore, appealed in examining the link between the Kabras and their source of wealth, which is mainly land. Apart from articulation of modes of production, the other theories that were used in this study are dependence, underdevelopment and post-modernism. Both primary and secondary sources provided the necessary data for this study. The secondary sources of data included published books and journals. The respondents interviewed were selectively sampled to identify the group considered as knowledgeable about the research area. The data collected was carefully interpreted, based on the objectives of the study. The research findings revealed that external socio-economic interests were forced on the Kabras by the colonialists without due consideration of their way of life and that the changing systems of Land-Use among the Kabras was a continuous process which had its roots in the past agriculture was accorded the highest priority in the Kabras land-use system. Also, interaction between the Kabras and their neighbours led to the transfer of iron working knowledge from the neighbours to Kabras, and as the Kabras people evolved, they systematically developed unique characteristics that defined their identity. This research is of great value to stakeholders and government officials in designing more effective strategies or interventions to improve land utilization in the Kakamega North Sub-County.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectChanging Patternsen_US
dc.subjectLand-Useen_US
dc.subjectKabrasen_US
dc.subjectKakamega Countyen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectc. 1963-2010en_US
dc.titleThe Changing Patterns of Land-Use among the Kabras of Kakamega County, Kenya c.1963-2010en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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