Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorPerris Wambui Chegeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiriti, Mutugi Peter
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-17T06:00:34Z
dc.date.available2021-09-17T06:00:34Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/22483
dc.descriptionA Research Project Submitted to the School of Business in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirement for the Award of the Degree of Master of Business Administration in Strategic Management of Kenyatta University, January 2020en_US
dc.description.abstractHumanitarian needs across the globe are at an unprecedented level with the numbers increasing every year owing to climate change, conflict and human activities. In Kenya, the most affected people are those living in the arid and semi-arid regions which account for around 80% of the total landmass and an estimated 30% of the total population. The regions are hardest hit by floods and drought due to inadequate land cover and infrastructural deficits resulting from historical marginalization. Humanitarian organizations are therefore at the center of delivery of services to this category of people. A challenge exists to the humanitarian organizations of how to best respond to the problems facing the people effectively with limited resources. The study showed that through supply chain optimization, desired service delivery levels can be achieved. Efforts have been made by various humanitarian players ranging from process automation, adoption of better transport and distribution practices and inventory management automation. However, there still exist supply chain challenges touching on service delivery; the general objective of the study was to establish the effect of supply chain optimization on service delivery in selected humanitarian organizations in Kenya. The specific objectives of the study sought to determine the effects of inventory management, strategic sourcing, technology and transport and distribution on service delivery in selected humanitarian organizations in Kenya. The study was anchored on the following theories; resource based theory, social network theory, time in transit theory and goal setting theory in bid to address the existing research gaps. The study adopted descriptive design and used census survey sampling method considering the fact that only a population of 28 was under consideration. Data was collected using self administered questionnaire with open and closed ended questions. Descriptive statistics such as percentages, mean, standard deviation and frequencies were used to estimate all quantitative variables. Multiple regressions analysis was used to analyze the data collected and the same presented in form of tables. The study findings revealed a statistically significant relationship between supply chain optimization and service delivery in selected humanitarian organizations in Kenya. The study also revealed that most aspects of supply chain optimization relied upon technology to function optimally with transport and distribution being the most influential supply chain optimization concept. Inventory management, strategic sourcing and technology were also found to have a positive and statistically significant relationship with service delivery. The study recommends that humanitarian organizations integrate supply chain functions using technology to enhance efficiency and accountability as well as build human resource capability to deal with the modern-day supply chain challenges. The study also recommends adoption of green transport options to reduce costs and to manage environmental impact through reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. For further research, the study recommends that the same topic be interrogated against other sectors for comparability of findingsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectSupplyen_US
dc.subjectChain Optimizationen_US
dc.subjectService Deliveryen_US
dc.subjectHumanitarian Organizationsen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleSupply Chain Optimization and Service Delivery in Selected Humanitarian Organizations in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record