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dc.contributor.authorGithae, Nicholas Muia
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-28T08:54:43Z
dc.date.available2019-10-28T08:54:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/19937
dc.descriptionA Research Project Submitted to the School of Humanities and Social Sciences in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Master of Public Policy and Administration of Kenyatta University, May, 2019en_US
dc.description.abstractWorld over, public officials have often been embroiled in scandals of varying magnitude. The genesis for most of these scandals is the gradual deterioration in ethical behavior of public officials, which has given rise to all kinds of malpractices. This has triggered condemnation from various stakeholders, especially the general public, for the development and implementation of policies that address ethics, integrity, transparency, accountability and professionalism, to promote accountability in the management of public resources and improve public sector results. Literature on ethical practices has focused heavily on the effects of corruption and the laws enacted to address it. There is scant literature on the challenges to ethical practices in the public sector in Kenya. This is despite the mounting evidence available on the challenges in tackling ethical practices in the country. The above necessitated this research with the aim of addressing the above knowledge gap on the subject. The study sought out to investigate the challenges of ethics, accountability, transparency, integrity and professionalism in the public service. It specifically discussed how procedural factors, institutional factors, social cultural factors and economic factors challenge the practice of integrity and ethical practices in Kenya’s public service. The research project is anchored on the Public Choice Theory and Broken Window Theory. The research project relied on primary data collected from the ethics and anti-corruption commission office. Procedural factors, institutional factors, socio-cultural factors, economic factors, were found to be satisfactory in explaining integrity and ethical practices in the public sector. This is supported by coefficient of determination also known as the R square of 72.4%. This means that procedural factors, institutional factors, socio-cultural factors, economic factors explain 72.4% of the variations in integrity and ethical practices. The R2 before moderation was 72.4% but after moderation the R2 improved to 75.9%. This implies that legal framework enhances the provision of integrity and ethical practices in the public sector. Regression analysis indicated that procedural factors and integrity and ethical practices in the public sector had a positive and significant relationship (r=.228, p=0.030). It was also found that institutional factors and integrity and ethical practices in the public sector have a positive and significant relationship (r=.390, p=0.000).The study also established that social cultural factors and integrity and ethical practices in the public sector have a positive and significant relationship (r=.277, p=0.004). Social cultural factors and integrity and ethical practices was found to have a positive and significant relationship (r=.282, p=0.007). The study concluded that procedural factors, institutional factors, socio-cultural factors, economic factors, impede integrity and ethical practices in the public sector in Kenya. The study recommends the revision of procedures in investigating and prosecuting individuals who commit economic crimes. The procedures should be systematic and supported legally. The study recommends the cooperation of various government institutions in taming and fighting graft. The various institutions include department of Criminal Investigation, EACC, the Judiciary, civil society and the religious groups. When this entire group pulls together, graft in Kenya will be rooted out. It was also recommended the inclusion of ethics and moral lessons in school curriculum. It is important that young generations are taught on the importance of being honest right at an early age. The society including community leaders, parents, religious leaders and teachers should teach good morals among the younger generation. The study recommends the facilitation of all institutions by enhancing theiren_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.titleAn Assessment of Challenges Facing Ethical Practices in the Public Sector in Kenya A Case of Ethics and Anti Corruption Commisionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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