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dc.contributor.authorBunyi, G.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T09:09:09Z
dc.date.available2014-06-25T09:09:09Z
dc.date.issued1999-07
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Educational Development Volume 19, Issues 4–5, July 1999, Pages 337–350en_US
dc.identifier.issn0738-0593
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/10121
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1016/S0738-0593(99)00034-6en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing Kenya as a case study, the paper demonstrates how indigenous African languages have suffered delegitimization and devaluation in education both in colonial and post-colonial Africa. Ethnographic data from Kenya are presented to show how the use of English as the medium of education contributes to differential educational treatments. It is argued that this leads to the perpetuation of social inequalities. The paper advances the argument that indigenous African languages should be given greater emphasis if education in Africa is to contribute to the much needed social, economic and political transformation. The paper makes suggestions as to how indigenous African languages in education can be introduced/strengthened.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectSocial transformationen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectPrimary levelen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous African languagesen_US
dc.subjectEthnographyen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleRethinking the place of African indigenous languages in African educationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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