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dc.contributor.authorKotut, K.
dc.contributor.authorPütz, S.
dc.contributor.authorKrienitz, L.
dc.contributor.authorBallot, A.
dc.contributor.authorEberhard, Krause
dc.contributor.authorWiegand, C.
dc.contributor.authorPflugmacher, S.
dc.contributor.authorCodd, G. A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-30T07:19:14Z
dc.date.available2014-05-30T07:19:14Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-30
dc.identifier.citationjournal of water and health: Volume 88, Issue 1.pages 159-167en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/9713
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1080/02772240500491604en_US
dc.description.abstractFeathers from carcasses of the Lesser Flamingo (Phoeniconaias minor), which had died after ingesting cyanobacterial toxins (cyanotoxins) contained between 0.02 and 30.0 µg microcystin-LR equivalents per gram of feather according to HPLC and ELISA analysis of feather extracts. Anatoxin-a was detected less frequently in the Lesser Flamingo feathers, up to 0.8 µg anatoxin-a per gram of feather being recorded. When feathers from different body regions were analysed and compared for microcystins and anatoxin-a, wing feathers were found to contain the highest concentrations of these cyanotoxins, the order of concentration and frequency of analytical detection being wing > breast > head. Consistent with the presence of the microcystins and anatoxin-a in gut contents and the livers of the dead birds and negligible in vitro adsorption to feathers, the cyanotoxins associated with the feathers of the dead wild flamingos are inferred to be primarily of dietary origin.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.subjectLesser Flamingoen_US
dc.subjectcyanotoxinsen_US
dc.subjectdepositionen_US
dc.subjectfeathersen_US
dc.subjectmicrocystinen_US
dc.subjectanatoxin\-aen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of the cyanotoxins anatoxin-a and microcystins in Lesser Flamingo feathersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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