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dc.contributor.authorNgaruiya, G. W.
dc.contributor.authorAndanje, S. A.
dc.contributor.authorBowkett, A. E.
dc.contributor.authorAgwanda, B. R.
dc.contributor.authorPlowman, A. B.
dc.contributor.authorWacher, T.
dc.contributor.authorAmin, R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-29T08:08:51Z
dc.date.available2014-05-29T08:08:51Z
dc.date.issued2011-07
dc.identifier.citationOryx / Volume 45 / Issue 03 / July 2011, pp 444-447en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-6053
dc.identifier.other1365-3008
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/9690
dc.descriptionDOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S003060531000181Xen_US
dc.description.abstractAders’ duiker Cephalophus adersi is a small antelope endemic to the coastal forests of east Africa. Threatened by habitat loss and hunting, the species is categorized as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. Until recently Aders’ duiker was known to persist only on Zanzibar, Tanzania, and in the Arabuko-Sokoke Forest National Reserve, Kenya. However, in 2004 a sighting of a single individual was reported from the Dodori forest in northern coastal Kenya, raising the possibility that the species survives elsewhere. Subsequently, an opportunistic camera-trap survey was conducted in September and October 2008 to establish the occurrence of Aders’ duiker in Kenyan coastal forests north of the Tana River. One hundred and fifty six images of Aders’ duikers were obtained from 12 of 28 camera-trap sites (46 of 358 camera-trap days), confirming the existence of a population of Aders’ duiker in the Boni–Dodori forest both inside and outside the National Reserves. In addition, we sighted individuals of the species on three occasions. The relatively high encounter rates per unit effort compared to similar data from Arabuko-Sokoke forest suggest the Boni–Dodori population is significant. Initial surveys of the local Awer community revealed that Aders’ duiker is well known by the name guno. These findings significantly improve the conservation prospects for Aders’ duiker and highlight the need for greater research and management efforts in the poorly known Boni–Dodori forest.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.subjectAders’ duikeren_US
dc.subjectBoni National Reserveen_US
dc.subjectcamera-trapen_US
dc.subjectCephalophus adersien_US
dc.subjectDodori National Reserveen_US
dc.subjectforest antelopeen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleA new population of the Critically Endangered Aders’ duiker Cephalophus adersi confirmed from northern coastal Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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