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dc.contributor.advisorOleche, M.
dc.contributor.advisorMaingi, J.
dc.contributor.authorKorir, Paul Kipkemoi
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-07T09:01:49Z
dc.date.available2014-03-07T09:01:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-03-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/9230
dc.descriptionDepartment of Applied Economics, 84pg. 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractDiaspora remittances to Kenya have seen a sharp and sustained rise over years, increasing from under $383 million in 2004 to over $890 million in 2011. This has not gone without leaving its macroeconomic impacts. According to Central Bank of Kenya, these remittances have led to higher savings and investments and consumption. Remittances however, can lead to the appreciation of a country's real exchange rate and hurt its competitiveness, a phenomenon known as Dutch disease. The overvalued real exchange rate makes the country's exports relatively expensive, imports cheaper and thus puts pressure on the country's current account. This study examined the relationship between Diaspora remittances and real effective exchange rate in Kenya and established the impacts of real effective exchange rate changes on net exports in Kenya. The study used secondary time series data that was obtained from Central Bank of Kenya, Kenya Bureau of Statistics, the IFS and the World Bank. Regression analysis was carried out using vector error correction (VECM) approach to examme the relationship between Diaspora remittances and real effective exchange rate and then applied VAR to find the impact of REER on net exportsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDiaspora Remittances and Dutch Disease in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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