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dc.contributor.advisorOkello-Agina, Bonventure Michael
dc.contributor.advisorGicheru, M. M.
dc.contributor.authorKiura, Simon Kivuti
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-24T11:19:53Z
dc.date.available2014-02-24T11:19:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/9041
dc.descriptionDepartment of Community Health, 82p. 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractAccording to KAIS 2007, nearly 1 out of 10 pregnant women in Kenya are infected with HIV (9.6 percent). The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of utilization of knowledge on prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV among pregnant women attending selected public health facilities in Embu District. In this study, utilization of knowledge on prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, utilization of providerinitiated counselling and testing and the common risky practices for HIV transmission among pregnant mothers was investigated. The study was a hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted in selected public health facilities in Embu District. Convenience sampling was applied to select the facilities then systematic random sampling technique was used to select respondents for the interview and participation in the study. A sample of 241 pregnant women was recruited on informed consent for the study. The data collection was by use of exit interview schedule. Data, including both coded answers and text responses, were entered into Microsoft Access and analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 18.0 (SPSS Inc.,Chikago.,IL). Of the respondents interviewed, majority (82%) were married while 1% were widowed; an important background characteristic when exploring patterns of HIV transmission in a population as about two-thirds of HIV-infected Kenyan adults are currently in a union. Majority (98%) of the respondents knew about condoms with 58% having been educated on condom use and 67% having used condoms. About half of the respondents said that they knew of a place where condoms are dispensed. To gauge the respondent’s community approval of condom use, 55% thought that the community approved use, with only 1% not knowing. The findings also showed that out of the 56% who had not visited provider-initiated counselling and testing clinic, 44% expressed fear of knowing their status, 17% trusted themselves and their partners, 4% experienced spouse refusal while 1% had not made a choice. On decision making regarding HIV test, 93% believed that their choice to the test was an independent decision. Analysis of parity trends revealed that women with primary education level’s parity to be increasing while that of secondary and post-secondary seemed to be decreasing. Chi - square analysis of education versus parity showed that there was no significance association (n=241, x²=142.8, df=1, p<0.05).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleUtilization of Knowledge on Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission of HIV among Pregnant Women Attending Selected Health Facilities in Embu District, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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