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dc.contributor.advisorOfafa, G. A.
dc.contributor.advisorWilson Muyinda Mande
dc.contributor.authorLalango, Jacob Oyugi
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-26T12:49:14Z
dc.date.available2012-03-26T12:49:14Z
dc.date.issued2012-03-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/3509
dc.descriptionDepartment of Business Administration,265p.The HB 615 .L3 2011
dc.description.abstractThis study was set up to analyse the contribution of entrepreneurship education to the development of self efficacy and entrepreneurial intentions among final year university students in Uganda. The study was important because of the on going debate that entrepreneurship cannot be taught, yet others say it is necessary and should be taught at all levels including universities. Consequently, doubts about the contribution of formal entrepreneurship education in Ugandan universities continue to arise especially when students presumed to have acquired entrepreneurial skills still come out of the universities as job seekers and less ready for self-employment. The study design was an analytical crosssectional survey since the data was collected from a cross section of selected university students and management at one point in time. Primary data was collected mainly through self-administered questionnaire techniques, focus group discussion and in-depth interviews. A net total of 255 students out of 2,223 students who did entrepreneurship course by end of their final year, were selected from three universities in Uganda, through simple random sampling, and were used in this study as respondents. The target population also included entrepreneurship lecturers (28), Heads of Department (3), Deans of faculties or schools (3) offering entrepreneurship education as well as Deputy Vice Chancellors in charge of Academic Affairs (3) and Academic Registrars (3) totalling to 40 respondents. The quantitative data obtained was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS) version 17.0 computer package. The qualitative data was analysed using thematic approach (spreadsheet package). Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used to present a variety of statistical information and to test the hypotheses. Findings revealed that content accounts for 18.3% variation in entrepreneurial intentions; objectives account for 17.6% of the variation in entrepreneurial intention while 17.4% of the variation was accounted for by the methods of teaching entrepreneurship education. The correlation results indicated a significant positive relationship between entrepreneurship education and intentions r (255) = 0.464, p<O.Ol). The result of the probability of starting business soon after graduation indicated that only 20.4% had high intentions whereas 59.6% indicated high probability of starting own business in the next five years after graduation. The overall total effect of entrepreneurship education was 0.74 (74%). The study contributes to the theory of planned behaviour by conftrming the self efficacy-intention mediation and by testing the effect of an exogenous influence (entrepreneurship education) on self efficacy and intentions towards the behaviour (entrepreneurship career). The study also contributes to, research on entrepreneurship education by revealing the contribution of entrepreneurship education to the development of entrepreneurial intentions among university students in Uganda. Furthermore, the hypothetical model developed in this study offer great utility and considerable potential for entrepreneurship scholars and entrepreneurship researchers in advancing theory. The findings here therefore add to existing theory and evidence that argues for the contribution of entrepreneurship education to the development of entrepreneurial intentions among university students. In the light of the fmdings, analysis and conclusions, it was recommended that universitiesenrlch the content of entrepreneurship education to emphasize risk management among others, intensify the teaching of entrepreneurship courses and professionalize them at the university. Lecturers should balance between critical thinking (left hand brain) and creative thinking (right hand brain) in the process of teaching entrepreneurship courses.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEntreprenuership --Uganda
dc.subjectBusiness enterprises --Uganda
dc.titleThe contribution of entrepreneurship education to the developement of entrepreneurial self-efficacy and intentions among university students in Ugandaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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