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dc.contributor.advisorJudith Kimiyween_US
dc.contributor.advisorMunga Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorIvy-Marie, Komutambo
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-13T08:04:53Z
dc.date.available2023-02-13T08:04:53Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/24760
dc.descriptionA Research Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Master of Science (Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics) in the School Health Sciences of Kenyatta University, November, 2022en_US
dc.description.abstractRapid growth and development are expected in the first two years of a child’s life. During this period, breastfeeding plays an important role. Poor optimal breastfeeding practices interfere with the intake of essential nutrients from breast milk leading to poor growth and development. In Uganda, 66% of children below six months are exclusively breastfed. Rapid growth during this time requires nutrient-dense foods like breast milk; without these foods, a child is prone to stunting, poor brain development, delayed achievement of milestones and malnutrition. The Uganda Demographic and Health Survey report indicates a decrease in the proportion of breastfed children from 82% to 50% among children 18-23 months. In Kabale, this manifests through increased malnutrition rates, specifically stunting (47%). This research focused on the growth and development of breastfed and non-breastfed children 0-23 months of age at the young child clinic, Kabale Hospital. A comparative cross-sectional study was used with both quantitative and qualitative approaches in data collection, analysis and presentation. The study targeted a sample of 250 children (0-23 months) and their caregivers, 125 breastfed children and 125 non-breastfed children. Structured researcher-administered questionnaires were used to determine socio-demographic characteristics and morbidity. Anthropometric measurements such as weight, length and MUAC were assessed using anthropometric measurements while the ages and stages questionnaire was used to cumulate information on developmental milestones. Data was analysed using SPSS version 22.0, and ENA for smart was used to analyse anthropometry. Data was presented in tables, and descriptive statistics were used to describe the different variables of the study. Bivariate analysis was used to establish the association of different variables in breastfed and non-breastfed children. The prevalence of undernutrition based on the three indices was wasting (5.2%), underweight (12%) and stunting (49.6%). Regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between the caregiver’s education level and fine motor skills (AOR=0.29, p=0.04), caregiver’s age and gross motor skills (AOR=15.34, p=0.020), child’s age and fine motor skills (AOR=7.594, p=0.002), weight for age and problem- solving skills (AOR=3.91, p=0.042), length for age and communication skills (AOR=3.68, p=0.033). Findings from the study showed that breastfed children had a better minimum dietary diversity score and nutritional status than non-breastfed children; however, there was no significant difference in morbidity and developmental milestones between the study groups. In addition, breastfeeding was not a predictor of developmental milestones. Factors like the caregiver’s age, education, child’s age, weight for age, length for age, and minimum dietary diversity score determined early childhood development. Caregivers should be encouraged to meet the minimum meal frequency. Mothers should receive continuous support and counselling on breastfeeding so their children can have a normal nutritional status, ultimately contributing to the achievement of developmental milestones. The government of Uganda should implement effective interventions like growth monitoring and promotion to decrease the high prevalence of stunting. Similar studies should be done with the inclusion of the home environment to observe its effect on developmental milestone.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectGrowth and Development of Breastfed and Non-Breastfed Children (0 - 23 Months)en_US
dc.subjectYoung Child Clinicen_US
dc.subjectKabale Hospital, Ugandaen_US
dc.titleGrowth and Development of Breastfed and Non-Breastfed Children (0 - 23 Months) at the Young Child Clinic, Kabale Hospital, Ugandaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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