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dc.contributor.advisorMukirae Njihiaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMutuma Michubuen_US
dc.contributor.authorJerop, Chepkwony Irene
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-11T10:59:35Z
dc.date.available2022-08-11T10:59:35Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/23911
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the School of Education in Partial Fulfilment for the Award of the Degree of Master of Education in Economics of Education Kenyatta University, May 2022en_US
dc.description.abstractInvesting in chemistry Teaching-learning resources in secondary schools enhances the spirit of inquiry and right attitudes to handle scientific tools resulting to a high student’s academic performance. This is critical for industrialization and development as envisioned in Kenya Vision 2030. However, students’ performance in chemistry has been dismal for several years, signalling pessimistic trend of unlikely realization of sufficient professionals in chemistry. Therefore, this study sought to establish: relationship between the utilization of ICT facilities and students’ academic performance in Chemistry, relationship between the utilization of laboratory apparatus and reagents and students’ academic performance in Chemistry, relationship between the use of library resources and students’ academic performance in Chemistry, and the relationship between the aggregate resources of ICT, Laboratory and Library facilities and students’ academic performance in Chemistry. This study was conducted in Kesses Sub-County, Uasin Gishu County, Kenya. For in-depth data analysis, correlation research design was used, while education production function formed the theoretical basis for this study. Structured questionnaires were used to collect primary data from students, school principals and chemistry teachers, while secondary data of KCSE students’ chemistry performance was obtained through document analysis. Multi-stage sampling was used in identifying sample units using school categories criterion, while systematic simple random sampling from class lists was used in administering students’ questionnaires. From all 43 secondary schools in the study area, the target population was 43 school principals, 70 chemistry teachers and 2530 form three students. Randomly selected sample units were 14 secondary schools, whereby a total of 148 students were representative of target population. Again, a total of 14 school principal and chemistry teacher were purposively selected to represent each sample unit as respondents. Data collected were analyzed using Excel and Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS – Version 26). Results of students’ chemistry performance showed extra-county and private schools had higher mean of 4.7 and 4.6, respectively, while sub-county depicted lower mean of 2.3, suggesting existence of variances in chemistry performance per school categories. Results of inferential tests from OLS regression model showed internet connectivity was positive and statistically significant at 0.670 (p< 0.001), suggests presence of internet connectivity enables usability of ICT facility for better understanding of chemistry. Again, regression results of influence of library facilities on chemistry performance, showed easily accessibility of chemistry reference books was negative and statistically significance at - 0277(p< 0.05), implying that provisioning accessibility of students to library facility doesn’t guarantee improved chemistry performance. Further, the positive and statistical significance of the results on the utilization of the aggregated facilities of ICT (1.103, p< 0.001) and Laboratory (0.899, p< 0.1) in influencing students’ performance in chemistry indicates the need of using the facility as entity rather than in piecemeal for better performance. In conclusion, investments by schools on ICT, Laboratory and Library facilities remains performance inputs, however, for a better chemistry performance these facilities should be utilized as a system. However, the significance of a random factor, which explains unobserved and/or omitted variable in OLS regression models pointed out to be critical for consideration for improved chemistry performance in schools hence, further investigation is recommended.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectUtilizationen_US
dc.subjectTeaching - Learning Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectEffecten_US
dc.subjectStudent’sen_US
dc.subjectKenya Certificate of Secondary Educationen_US
dc.subjectPerformanceen_US
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
dc.subjectUasin Gishu Countyen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleUtilization Of Teaching - Learning Resources and its Effect on Student’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education Performance in Chemistry, Uasin Gishu County Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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