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dc.contributor.advisorJohn Paul Oyoreen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEunice Njoguen_US
dc.contributor.authorMW ANGI, PERIS WANJIKU
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-16T11:44:16Z
dc.date.available2022-06-16T11:44:16Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/23827
dc.descriptionA Research Thesis Submitted in Partial Fullfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Public Health (Monitoring and Evaluation) in the School of Public Health and Applied Human Sciences of Kenyatta Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that, undernutrition in all its forms accounts for 45% of all deaths of children aged less than five years and contribute to 3.1 million child deaths each year. Poor Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) conditions, primarily through repeated diarrhoea and intestinal nematode infections as poor WASH effects, account for 40-60% of childhood malnutrition. This study sought to describe the caregivers' hygiene and sanitation conditions associated with the nutrition status among children aged 6-59 months in Kiandutu Informal Settlement, Kiambu County. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used with a sample size of 165 participants. Data was collected using researcher administered questionnaire for the caregivers, observation checklists, KII schedules and FGD guide. Anthropometric data for children aged 6-59 months was also collected using height board for height, salter scale for weight and MUAC tape. Data analysis was done using SPSS whereby Pearson's chi-square tests was used to test associations between caregivers' hygiene and sanitation status and children's nutritional status. The level of significance was set at P value (p<0.05). Bloom Cut off points were used to scale WASH knowledge as either high, moderate or low depending on the scores out of 100 percent. Results are presented in form of graphs and tables. The study established that there was low (88.1 %) and moderate (11.9%) knowledge on WASH among caregivers. WASH practices were poor too: only 23.9% got drinking water from piped sources, 61.6% did not treat before drinking, 71.9% did not have access to a latrine and 55% of those who washed hands used water only. The nutritional status was 33.3%, 15.1% and 8.8% for stunting, underweight and wasting respectively. WASH practices such as source of drinking water in households (X2=24.033; p=0.026; df=2) and caregivers' h~ndwashing practice (X2=44.459; p=<O.OOI; df=I) showed a significant relationship with the child's nutritional status. WASH knowledge had a significant relationship with the nutritional status (X2=3.836; p=0.036; df=l ). The study recommends that the county government and any other relevant authority should increase health communication, education and information sharing especially in household to raise the level of WASH knowledge which will in turn improve WASH practice. Further, there should be emphasis on the importance of integrating WASH components in all nutrition programs to help fight malnutrition in children.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectKiambu Countyen_US
dc.subjectInformal Settlementen_US
dc.subjectKiandutuen_US
dc.subjectCaregivers' Hygieneen_US
dc.subjectSanitationen_US
dc.subjectNutritionen_US
dc.titleCaregivers' Hygiene and Sanitation Conditions Associated with Nutrition Status of Children 6-59 Months in Kiandutu Informal Settlement, Kiambu County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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