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dc.contributor.authorNdung’u, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKimani, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorKirui, Angeline
dc.contributor.authorMukonene, Jerusha
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-15T05:39:43Z
dc.date.available2022-06-15T05:39:43Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationNdung’u Paul1* Kimani Samuel2 Kirui Angeline2 Mukonene Jerusha1 (2019) Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Knowledge and Its Impact on Practice Among Clinicians at a County Referral Hospital in Kenya Information and Knowledge Management www.iiste.org ISSN 2224-5758 (Paper) ISSN 2224-896X (Online) DOI: 10.7176/IKM Vol.9, No.7, 2019en_US
dc.identifier.issn2224-896X
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/23818
dc.descriptionA Research Article in the Information and Knowledge Managementen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a life-saving emergency procedure that ensures oxygen and blood supply in a victim who have had heart and/or breathing stoppage thereby maintaining the viability of vital organs until professional help arrives. All the health care workers should have adequate knowledge and skills to perform the procedure with ease in case of cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac death in the western countries ranges from 300,000 to 400, 000 annually. This represents 0.36 to 1.28 per 1000 population in Europe and the United States. American Heart Association approximates that 100000 to 200000 adult lives could be saved annually if CPR is initiated early enough. The outcome of a patient with a cardiac event is determined by the knowledge and skills of the resuscitator and the promptness in which the procedure is instituted and the nature of the patient condition among others. Objective: To evaluate CPR knowledge and its impact on practice amongst clinicians working at Coast General Hospital, Mombasa Kenya. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried at the hospital in 2015 where a questionnaire was administered to 91 nurses, 27 clinical officers and 24 doctors. Results: The study comprised of 142 clinicians; 63.8% (n=90) nursing officers, 19.1% (n=27) clinical officers and 17.1% (n=24) medical officers. Their levels of training were; 57.4% (n=81) diploma, 25.5% (n=36) bachelors degree, 12.8% (n=18) higher diploma, 2.8% (n=4) certificate, and 1.4% (n=2) masters degree. The level of training was significant (P =0.04) on the way they rated their CPR practices. It’s only a quarter of the clinicians who trained CPR at their respective colleges. A majority 68.8% (n=97) had trained on CPR and the training was significant (P=0.000) on the way they rated their CPR practices. Three quarters 75.9% (n=104) were scored below average on specific aspects on CPR knowledge. This was significant (P =0.001) on their rating of CPR practices. A third 33.3% (n= 47) of the clinicians had taken more than three years since their last training. This significantly (P =0.000) affected the way they rated their CPR practices. Conclusion: The CPR practices at Coast General Hospital are significantly affected by the clinicians’ knowledge. The hospital administration needs to plan for frequent refresher trainings for all the staff. Professional bodies need to encompass CPR CPD points as a requirement to renewing practicing licences.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIISTEen_US
dc.subjectCPD (continuing profession development)en_US
dc.subjectCoast General Hospitalen_US
dc.subjectClinicianen_US
dc.subjectCardiac arresten_US
dc.subjectCardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)en_US
dc.titleEvaluation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Knowledge and Its Impact on Practice among Clinicians at a County Referral Hospital in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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