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dc.contributor.advisorLucy-Joy M. Wachiraen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAdewale L. Oyeyemien_US
dc.contributor.advisorVincent O. Onyweraen_US
dc.contributor.authorNakabazzi, Bernadette
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-20T08:05:35Z
dc.date.available2022-04-20T08:05:35Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/23615
dc.descriptionA Research Thesis Submitted in Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Exercise and Sport Science) in the School of Public Health and Applied Human Sciences of Kenyatta University, August 2021en_US
dc.description.abstractChildren’s regular participation in physical activity is associated with numerous health benefits. However, majority of children globally are insufficiently active. There is scarcity of objectively measured physical activity data in many African countries. The aim of this study was to assess accelerometer-measured physical activity and determine the socio-demographic and parental perceived home and neighbourhood-built environment correlates of physical activity among school going children in Kampala city. School going children (n=256) aged between 10 and 12 years from randomly selected schools participated in this cross-sectional study. Physical activity was measured using the ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer (ActiGraph LLC, Pensacola, FL, USA) for 7 consecutive days. Socio-demographics and parental perceived home and neighbourhood-built environment characteristics were assessed using a parent/guardian questionnaire. Weight and height of each child were measured. Multi-level mixed effects logistic regressions tested for the correlations between parental perceived home and neighbourhood-built environment attributes and children’s physical activity. Data were analysed using STATA statistical software version 14.2. Children spent most of their time sedentary (590.6±124 minutes/day) and less time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (56±25.7 minutes/day). Only 36.3% of the children met the physical activity guidelines. Boys, public schools, and thin/normal weight children were more likely to meet physical activity guidelines. Socio-demographic factors associated with odds of meeting physical activity guidelines were attending a public school (OR: 7.5, 95% CI: [ 4.24 – 13.32], p < 0.001), thin/normal weight status (OR: 5.88; 95% CI: [2.30 - 15.00], p < 0.001), lower maternal level of education (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: [2.12 - 6.24], p <0.001) and no car ((OR: 4.72, 95% CI: [2.10 – 10.60], p < 0.001)). At home level, parents of children in private schools reported more rules for physical activity, child’s personal electronics and play equipment. The number of play equipment at home inversely predicted children's MVPA compliance (OR: -1.31, 95% CI: [-1.94 - 0.67], p<0.001). At neighbourhood level, parents of children from private schools perceived higher crime safety, while parents of children from public schools perceived a higher residential density and street connectivity. Parental perceived crime in the neighbourhood inversely predicted children’s MVPA compliance (OR: -0.25, 95% CI: [-0.45 - 0.04], p < 0.05); whereas parental perceived residential density positively predicted children’s MVPA compliance (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: [0.13 - 1.05], p < 0.05). The current study recommends effective and sustainable intervention strategies that will increase children’s physical activity (MVPA) and reduce sedentary time. Sociodemographic factors of weight status (overweight/obese), maternal education level (high), car ownership (one or more cars) may be relevant evidence base to consider when designing intervention programmes that promote physical activity among school going children in Kampala cityen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectPerceived Homeen_US
dc.subjectNeighbourhood Builten_US
dc.subjectEnvironment Correlatesen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen_US
dc.subjectSchool-Going Childrenen_US
dc.subjectKampala Cityen_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titlePerceived Home and Neighbourhood Built Environment Correlates of Physical Activity among School-Going Children in Kampala City in Ugandaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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