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dc.contributor.advisorMargaret Kerakaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPeterson Warutereen_US
dc.contributor.authorMercy, Kamau Muthoni
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-13T11:34:09Z
dc.date.available2021-10-13T11:34:09Z
dc.date.issued2021-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/22767
dc.descriptionA Research Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Award of Degree of Master of Science in Public Health (Reproductive Health) in the School of Public Health Sciences of Kenyatta University,June 2021.en_US
dc.description.abstractKenya has made great strides towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in recent years, specifically SDG 3.7. that aims at ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services, including family planning, information and education. The FP2020 data has shown that use of modern contraceptives in the country had reached 59%, surpassing the country target of 58%, and leading to the number being revised to 66% by 2030. However, among the lowest wealth quantile population such as residents of Mukuru kwa Njenga use of modern contraceptives has remained low at 29 %. Despite male factors being a common reason for not using modern methods, most studies focus on female factors. This study aimed to establish factors associated with use of modern contraceptives among men in union in Mukuru kwa Njenga informal settlement. Questioners were administered to 398 men in union to collected quantitative data while three focused group discussions were conducted to gather qualitative data to complement quantitative. The study found that among social demographic characteristics only age had a significant association with modern contraceptive use. Men aged 25-29 were more likely to use modern contraceptive (P=0.034) compared to men in the other age bracket. Significant association (p=0.009) was also found between men who thought modern contraceptives are good as well as those who believed people are incomplete without children (p=0.009). Those who discussed (p=0.025) with their partner on how many children to have and those who initiated the discussions themselves (p=0.000) were more likely to use modern contraceptive. Media (56%) and friends (23.8%) remained the main source of information on modern contraceptives. However, there was no association found between knowledge of modern contraceptive and use. This study concluded that among the social demographic characteristics only age was significantly associated with use of modern contraceptives. The study recommends that the policy makers, reproductive health managers and practitioners need to design strategies for reaching out to men in the lowest wealth quantiles taking into consideration socio-demographic characteristics, attitude, spousal communication and going beyond men’s knowledge to promote useen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectInfluenceen_US
dc.subjectMale Involvementen_US
dc.subjectModern Contraceptivesen_US
dc.subjectSexual Partnersen_US
dc.titleInfluence of Male Involvement on use of Modern Contraceptives among Sexual Partners in Nairobi City County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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