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dc.contributor.advisorJohn Kabutha Mugo
dc.contributor.advisorRachel W. Kamau-Kang'ethe
dc.contributor.authorMundi, Scolastica Nkinga
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-21T12:34:23Z
dc.date.available2011-11-21T12:34:23Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/1696
dc.descriptionDepartment of Special Education, 99p. LC 1203.K4M8 2009
dc.description.abstractKenya has practiced integration for the last twenty years, but this deprives interaction for the children with disability in a learning environment. Inclusive education is the current trend of education recommended by the Dakar Framework of action. Inclusive education is still a novel idea in Kenya eight years after Dakar framework of action despite the effort to train teachers in certificate, diploma and graduate levels in special education. The philosophy of inclusive education has stimulated discourse among stakeholders, policy makers, professionals and lobby groups. Whereas the policy makers seem to be supporting inclusive education, there are no practical measures in place towards its implementation. Though varied means of implementation have been suggested, actualizing these theoretical notions remains a challenge. Investigations indicate that majority of parents and teachers are not aware of inclusive education. This study endeavored to establish the existing social and cultural perceptions of parents and teachers and their advocacy strategies towards inclusive education. Four schools were investigated; Kambui Primary special and Nyaga Boys Secondary integrated Schools for hearing impaired and Thika Secondary special and African Independent Church Kajiado Girls' Primary integrated schools for the Visually Impaired. A conceptual model derived from Brofenbrenner's Ecology Theory guided the study. Five Parents in each school were selected through convenience sampling and a Focus Group Discussion was administered with the help of research assistant. Teachers were purposively sampled and an interview guide administered to both teachers and head teachers. These were analyzed using conversational analysis method and presented in thematic form. A bio data sheet was used to get the demographic details and was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The study established that teachers supported inclusive education as long as relevant facilities are provided and teachers trained in inclusive education. The parents' in the integrated schools were supportive to inclusive setting but the parents in special schools were reluctant to embrace it. Social and cultural attributes such as beliefs, taboos, stigma and negative attitude among teachers and parents had impact on inclusive education. Social class and communication were some of the social barriers established. Awareness campaigns, co-curricular activities and teacher training were identified as ways to overcome existing barriers. Parents in special schools were opposed to any form of advocacy while parents in integrated schools suggested follow up, provision of financial and material support. The teachers' advocacy was through public awareness during parents meetings, in the church, public barazas (meeting) and in schools and lobbying for material and financial support. Strategies by teachers include suitable pedagogy such as Individualized Education Program, peer tutoring, provision of facilities and adapting environment. Parents' involvement in education and an active parent's organization was important. The policy on inclusive education should be treated a matter of urgency. The teacher training curriculum should incorporate inclusive education and teachers given incentives. Sensitization and awareness programs should be vibrant while dialogue among all the stakeholders is a prime considerationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectInclusive education--Kenya
dc.subjectChildren with disabilities--education--Kenya
dc.titleSocio-cultural perceptions of teachers and parents on inclusive education in four selected special and intergrated schools in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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