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dc.contributor.authorNjeru, P. N. M.
dc.contributor.authorMaina, I.
dc.contributor.authorMugwe, J.
dc.contributor.authorMucheru-Muna, M.
dc.contributor.authorMugendi, D.
dc.contributor.authorLekasi, J. K.
dc.contributor.authorKimani, S. K.
dc.contributor.authorMiriti, J.
dc.contributor.authorMugo, B. J.
dc.contributor.authorMwangi, H.
dc.contributor.authorOeba, V. O.
dc.contributor.authorMuriithi, F.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-21T15:44:20Z
dc.date.available2016-07-21T15:44:20Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationAfrican Crop Science Conference Proceedings, Vol. 11. pg. 707 - 712 Printed in Uganda 2013, African Crop Science Societyen_US
dc.identifier.issn1023070X/2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/14848
dc.descriptionConference paperen_US
dc.description.abstractRain-fed agricultural productivity has continually declined due to unpredictable and unreliable rainfall patterns in Kirinyaga West County. The decline in food productivity has been as a result of inadequate understanding of intra-seasonal rainfall variability to develop optimal cropping calendar. A study was conducted to access the effect of various water harvesting and integrated soil fertility management technologies for enhanced sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) productivity in Kirinyaga West County, Central Kenya. The field experiment was laid out in Partially Balanced Incomplete Block Design (PBIBD) with a total of 36 treatments replicated three times. The treatments of tied ridges and contour furrows under sorghum alone plus external soil amendment of 40 Kg P /ha + 20 Kg N /ha + manure 2.5 t/ha had the highest grain yield ranging from 3.3 t/ha to 3.6t/ha. The soil fertility levels differed significantly from one another (p=0.0001) in terms of sorghum grain yield. Generally, all experiment controls had the lowest grain yields as low as 0.4 t/ha to 0.6 t/ha. Therefore, integration of minimal organic and inorganic inputs under various water harvesting technologies could be considered as an alternative option towards food security as a way of climate change mitigation options for Kirinyaga West County in Central Kenya. Key words: Climate change, food security, soil amendmentsen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAfrican Crop Science Societyen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectFood securityen_US
dc.subjectSoil amendmentsen_US
dc.titleAdapting conservation agriculture to climate change variability: An overview of sorghum and cowpea production in Kirinyaga west countyen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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