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dc.contributor.authorMuiruri, S.
dc.contributor.authorKabiru, Ephantus W.
dc.contributor.authorMuchiri, E. M.
dc.contributor.authorHussein, H.
dc.contributor.authorKagondu, F.
dc.contributor.authorLaBeaud, A. D.
dc.contributor.authorKing, C. H.
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-10T13:47:17Z
dc.date.available2015-07-10T13:47:17Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationAm J Trop Med Hyg. 2015, vol. 92 no. 2: 394-400en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9637
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/13147
dc.descriptiondoi: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0440en_US
dc.description.abstractFew studies have focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) transmission in less arid, transitional landscapes surrounding known high-risk regions. The objective of this study was to identify evidence of RVFV exposure in Bodhei Village in a forested area at the edge of the RVFV-epidemic Garissa region. In a household cluster-based survey conducted between epidemics in early 2006, 211 participants were enrolled. Overall seroprevalence for anti-RVFV was high (18%) and comparable with rates in the more arid, dense brush regions farther north. Seroprevalence of adults was 28%, whereas that of children was significantly lower (3%; P < 0.001); the youngest positive child was age 3 years. Males were more likely to be seropositive than females (25% versus 11%; P < 0.01), and animal husbandry activities (birthing, sheltering, and butchering) were strongly associated with seropositivity. The results confirm that significant RVFV transmission occurs outside of recognized high-risk areas and independent of known epidemic periods.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen_US
dc.titleCross-sectional Survey of Rift Valley Fever Virus Exposure in Bodhei Village Located in a Transitional Coastal Forest Habitat in Lamu County, Kenya.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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