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dc.contributor.authorNyamache, A. K.
dc.contributor.authorKoigi, P.
dc.contributor.authorNgayo, Musa Otieno
dc.contributor.authorKhamadi, Samoel
dc.contributor.authorNgugi, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T12:02:08Z
dc.date.available2015-03-10T12:02:08Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationBMC Research Notes 2014, 7:890en_US
dc.identifier.issn1756-0500
dc.identifier.other1756-0500
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1756-0500/7/890/
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295353/pdf/13104_2014_Article_3405.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/12357
dc.description.abstractBackground: The ever-expanding rollout of antiretroviral therapy in poor resource settings without routine virological monitoring has been accompanied with development of drug resistance that has resulted in limited treatment success. Methods: A cross-sectional study with one time viral load was conducted during the period between 2012 and 2013 to determine treatment failure and drug resistance mutations among adults receiving first-line (44) (3TC_d4T/ AZT_NVP/EFV) and second-line (20) (3TC/AZT/LPV/r) in Nairobi, Kenya. HIV-1 pol-RT genotyping for drug resistance was performed using an in-house protocol. Results: A total of 64 patients were recruited (mean age 36.9 yrs.) during the period between 2012 and 2013 of the 44 adult patients failing first-line 24 (40.9%) had drug resistance mutations. Eight (8) patients had NRTI resistance mutations with NAMS M184V (54.2%) and K65R (8.4%) mutations being the highest followed by TAMs T215Y and K70R (12.5%). In addition, among patients failing second-line (20), six patients (30%) had NNRTI resistance; two patients on K103N and G190A mutations while V106A, Y184V, A98G, Y181C mutations per patient were also detected. However, for NRTI two patients had TAM T215Y. M184V mutation occurred in one patient. Conclusions: The study findings showed that HIV-1 drug resistance was significantly high in the study population. The detected accumulated resistance strains show that emergence of HIV drug resistance will continue to be a big challenge and should be given more attention as the scale up of treatment in the country continuesen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.subjectAntiretroviral drug resistanceen_US
dc.subjectResource-limited settingsen_US
dc.subjectSecond-line therapyen_US
dc.titleHIV type 1 drug resistance patterns among patients failing first and second line antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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