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dc.contributor.authorKabaria-Muriithi, Joan
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-01T12:11:15Z
dc.date.available2014-09-01T12:11:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/11098
dc.descriptionDepartment of Community Resource Management and Extension, 167p. 2014, HV 6626.2 .M8en_US
dc.description.abstractIntimate partner violence (lPV) is a form of gender based violence that involves the range of sexual, psychological, economic and physically coercive acts used against men and women by their current or former intimate partners. Women are more vulnerable to IPY. However, not much is understood about the vice and the associated patterns of risk. The purpose of the study was to analyze the predisposing factors associated with IPV and to assess the severity of IPV on women survivors in shelter homes in Kenya. The specific objectives of the study were to: determine the survivors' perception of predisposing factors that make women susceptible to IPV; establish the levels of severity of IPV on women survivors in shelter homes in Kenya; investigate the relationship between predisposing factors and severity of IPV from women seeking support services from shelters available in Kenya and to identify the coping strategies for women survivors of IPV. The Feminist theory by Dobash & Dobash and walker (1979) was used to conceptualize various risk factors that predispose women to IPV. The study was conducted in Nairobi and Nakuru which had the only two available women shelter homes in Kenya providing support services for IPV survivors. A survey design was employed. The study sample comprised 230 women survivors who had visited the shelters homes. Primary data was collected with the use of interview schedules for IPV survivors and key informant interview guide for service providers as well as Focus Group Discussion guides for Community Health Workers. Secondary data was also generated using records in the shelter homes. Data analysis for quantitative data was done using the Statistical Package for . Social Sciences (SPSS) while the qualitative data was sorted and analyzed mathematically based on the objectives. Chi-square results revealed a significant relationship between severity of IPV and women survivors' education (p=0.003), Number of children (p=0.005), marital status (p=0.006) witnessing of inter-parental violence (p=0.05), perpetrators' upbringing (p=0.040), perpetrators' occupation (p=0.007), use of alcohol (p=0•.002), use of other substances and drugs (p=O.OOO), experience of violence in childhood (p=O.O13) and perpetrators' education level (p=0.012). On multivariate analysis, the strongest predisposing factors to severity of IPV were found to be the number of children born to the women survivors (p=O.OOl), perpetrator level of education (p=0.054) and perpetrator use of alcohol (p=O.OO1). The study concluded that IPV is a serious social and economic vice that requires a proactive role of state, non-state actors, community members and active participation of both the survivors and perpetrators in order to address it. The study recommended that there was need to enforce the existing National Policy Framework on Gender Based Violence, which provides an important structure for the management of severity of IPV. There was also need for strengthening of the collaboration between the relevant government departments, shelter homes, religious leaders and community leaders in the management of IPV. The result of this would be reduction in the occurrence and severity of TPV.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of intimate partner violence among women survivors in shelter homes in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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