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dc.contributor.authorDanga, B. O.
dc.contributor.authorBen-Hur, M.
dc.contributor.authorWakindiki, I.I.C.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T07:08:34Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T07:08:34Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4020-5759-5
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4020-5760-
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/9841
dc.description.abstractRunoff and soil erosion are responsible for about 83% of the land degradation worldwide. Many smallholder farmers in arid and semi-arid areas of Africa often use inexpensive indigenous soil and water conservation (ISWC) techniques to control runoff and erosion. This paper is a review of the ISWC methods and categorizes them into three: those suitable for semi-arid areas, those suitable for wet areas and those suitable for both semi-arid and wet areas. The usefulness of ISWC is generally appreciated but literature on the subject is scarce. A case study that investigated effects of 2-m spaced trash lines on runoff, erosion and crop yield in a cowpea – maize rotation is presented. Trash lines reduced runoff and soil loss and increased crop biomass yield three-fold. We conclude that ISWC like close-spaced trash lines are beneficial soil and water conservation methods and should be incorporated in future land resource conservation programmesen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.subjectLand husbandry,en_US
dc.subjectsoil degradationen_US
dc.subjectland rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectarid soilsen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.titleIndigenous soil and water conservation techniques in smallholder farms in Africa.en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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