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dc.contributor.authorHassanali, Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorDemas, F. A.
dc.contributor.authorMwangi, E. N.
dc.contributor.authorKunjeku, E. C.
dc.contributor.authorMabveni, A. R.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-30T13:27:12Z
dc.date.available2013-04-30T13:27:12Z
dc.date.issued2002-01-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Insect Behavior (impact factor: 0.96). 01/2002; 15(4):477-494.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/6724
dc.descriptionDOI:10.1023/A:1016377132585en_US
dc.description.abstractThe role of host size, movement, feeding status, color, and species in the visual host evaluation and recognition behavior of the tick parasitoid, Ixodiphagus hookeri Howard was investigated. Freshly emerged female parasitoids were subjected to a choice bioassay, where the test materials were placed in sealed vials and the vials placed in a Petri dish. When presented with A. variegatum live and mummified nymphs, females examined: larger nymphs significantly longer than smaller nymphs, fed nymphs significantly longer than unfed nymphs, dead and live nymphs for similar lengths of time, and grey live nymphs and yellow-brown and dark brown mummified nymphs for similar lengths of time. The total number of visits to vials containing these test materials were also not significantly different, except there were significantly more visits to yellow-brown mummies when compared to the number of visits to dark brown mummies. When presented with A. variegatum (host) and R. appendiculatus (nonhost) nymphs, the females examined A. variegatum nymphs significantly longer than R. appendiculatus nymphs. The total number of visits to vials containing A. variegatum nymphs were significantly more than the visits to the vials containing R. appendicualtus nymphs. Furthermore, females spent significantly more total examination time per visit on larger and fed A. variegatum nymphs when compared to smaller and unfed nymphs, respectively. Direct and indirect detection were significant when females were presented with fed versus unfed A. variegatum nymphs, grey nymphs versus yellow-brown mummies, and R. appendiculatus versus A. variegatum nymphs. Direct and indirect detection for the rest of the bioassays were not significantly different. Finally, The percentages of females contacting large fed A. variegatum nymphs first were significantly different from those of females contacting small unfed R. appendiculatus nymphs first. The firstcontact percentages for the rest of the bioassays were not significantly different.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Insect Behavioren_US
dc.titleVisual Evaluation and Recognition of Hosts by the Tick Parasitoid, Ixodiphagus hookeri (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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