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dc.contributor.authorOdhiambo, Josephine Anyango
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-19T07:51:02Z
dc.date.available2013-03-19T07:51:02Z
dc.date.issued2013-03-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/6497
dc.description.abstractDespite advances in understanding of food borne diseases, quite a large number of patients die every year due to consumption of contaminated food Seafood borne diseases occur after eating contaminated crustaceans or fish and range from mild illnesses often referred to as "food poison" to life threatening diseases such as cholera and typhoid. This makes microbial quality of marketed seafood to be a contentious issue in major seafood eating areas. This study was carried out between November 2008 and April 2009, to investigate the prevalence of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in preserved crustaceans and fish sold in Mombasa. Three hundred and sixty samples of crustaceans and fish preserved using different methods (smoking, drying, salting, frying, freezing and canning) were randomly purchased from local markets (Kongowea, Mwembe Tayari, Shibu street, Majengo and Likoni) in Mombasa. The samples were analyzed for the presence of bacteria and fungi both pathogenic and of spoilage category. From the market centres, crustaceans and fish samples were placed in sterile polythene bags and taken to the laboratory at Kenya Marine and Research Institute (KEMFRI) at Mkomani near the Mombasa show ground. In the laboratory each sample was given a code and microbiological procedures were started within 24 hours after the collection. Microbial specimens were collected from seafood samples by homogenizing 25 g portion of each sample in 225 ml of Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) in a stomacher. The homogenates were serially diluted up to 10-5 and then, cultured in three replicates of Nutrient agar and Saboraud dextrose agar to determine total microbial counts. The results showed that scallops had highest microbial count among crustaceans with bacterial counts of (9.24xl02) and fungal of (9.2xlOl) totaling to (l.016x103). In fish highest microbial count was in sardines (5.57xI02) which comprised of bacterial (6.9x101) and fungal (4.88x102). Microbial specimens were cultured in selective media such as (TCBS, MOX agar, TSI, MacConkey agar, Baid Parker and Brain heart Infusion) to identify bacteria; then in Czapeck medium, YM - 11 agar, Dichloran - 18% glycerol and Potato dextrose agar to identify fungi species. Pathogenic bacteria identified were Vibrio species (3.97xlO ) and Salmonella (2.76xI02). Fungi of clinical importance identified were Aspergillus species only (I.50xI02). Crustaceans and fish preserved using different methods showed varied levels of microbial contamination ranging from (2.70xl0-1- 2.73xl0o) in canned to (1.44xIOo - 2.56x102) in dried sardines. From the results of the study which showed clear evidence of the presence of both pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in preserved seafoods; strict surveillance should be put in place to ensure microbial seafood safety in Mombasaen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIsolation and Identification of Pathogenic and Spoilage Bacteria and Fungi Found in Preserved Crustaceans and Fish Sold in Mombasa, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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