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dc.contributor.authorKang'ta, Janet Wabera
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-18T08:05:22Z
dc.date.available2012-05-18T08:05:22Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/4682
dc.descriptionThe LB 1530.K3en_US
dc.description.abstractThe primary concern of this study was to ascertain whether social studies teachers serving in the primary schools are prepared for their role in their class. The study was faced by two major limitations. Firstly, it was confined to three primary schools in Nairobi and two primary teacher-training colleges. This will, therefore, not allow for generalization to be made from the findings for all schools in Nairobi province or in Kenya. The same case applies to the colleges. Secondly, the amount of money allocated for this project posed a serious limitation mainly it was too little to allow the researcher to deal with a very large sample. The study was limited to three primary schools in Nairobi, which had used by Kenya Institute of Education, together with others that the researcher did not visit, in the experimental stages of the Primary Education Project (P.E.P.). The social studies teachers in the three schools served as the subjects for the study. Another category of subjects that were selected for this study originated from two teacher-training colleges. Second year student teachers from these colleges were requested to respond to a questionnaire. Two sets of questionnaires and an interview schedule were the main tools used for the collection of data. The researcher in person to the social studies practicing teachers as well as the student teachers administered the questionnaires. The data, so collected, was analyzed and presented in form of tables where possible. After analysing the data, it was found that social studies teachers need in-service education regularly to enlighten them on any changes that may be made in the curriculum. It was also clear that a majority of the said teachers had not attended in-service courses related to social studies and for those who had attended such courses they complained that the courses were short-lived and without any follow up. The pre-service training had tried to acquit the teachers with what expected of them, the teaching strategies included, in the teaching but this training could only be treated as the initial orientation to the teaching which must have been followed by in-service education if the teachers felt inadequate regarding the knowledge, skills and attitudes that they had to help the pupils acquire. There was the feeling among teachers that the instructional materials provided by Kenya Institute of Education were sketchy and not helpful to the teachers. These, and many other problems that the teachers’ faces in the teaching of social studies need to be solved before the teacher can be expected to implement the new course effectively.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciences--study and teaching (primary) Kenyaen_US
dc.titleThe teaching of social studies teachers prepared for their roles in the classen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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