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dc.contributor.authorNjogu, Irene Nyambura
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-24T11:47:42Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T11:47:42Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/2837
dc.descriptionThe LB 2845.K4N52en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the role of inspectorate in maintenance of standards of education and problems that are encountered. The focus of this study was however on the inspectors role and any other tasks they carry out other than their core functions of inspecting schools. Their qualifications, job satisfactions, and training was also examined The headteachers, principal and teachers also contributed by revealing their attitudes towards inspectors in order for the researcher to determine if inspectors were effective in carrying out their roles. The review of literature showed that the roles of inspectorate are many and varied. Other than inspecting schools the inspectors was supposed to do other administrative tasks. The selected sample was made up of fifteen inspectors, ten primary school head teachers, five principals, twenty primary school teachers and five secondary school teachers. The researcher used three kinds of instruments 1. Inspectors interviews schedule 2. Principals and head teachers questionnaire 3. Teachers questionnaire The researcher interviewed the inspectors and visited the schools sampled to ensure teacher, head teachers and principals filled questionnaires. The results of the analysis were presented as frequency and percentage distribution and tabled appropriately. The study found among other things that inspectors had many administrative tasks that prevented them from inspecting schools efficiently and effectively. They also faced problems of lack of vehicles for transport, funds, support staff, low remuneration, negative attitude of teachers, lack of coordination by the district inspector of schools and delay on taking action on inspection reports. Most of the inspectors academic and professional qualification was found wanting with most of them being P1 and P2 who have been given meritorial grades like A.T.S.I and A.T.S.II. The inspectors do not receive any formal pre-service or in-services training other than one to two weeks induction courses organised by District or Provincial Inspectors. A few recommendations on how to improve efficiency of the inspectorate were made. This recommendations included selection of inspectors from qualified and experienced teachers, formal training of inspectors to change their attitudes, provision of support staff to ease their administrative tasks and improved remuneration to boost their motivation and commitment. It was also found necessary to involve them in taking administrative action on inspection reports. The administration of the inspectorate should also be streamlined. It was however recommended that future scholars using wider sample possibly like a province or the whole nation consider a replica of this study. This would explore more solid conclusions than the inductions study warranted.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSchool management and organizationen_US
dc.titleThe role of inspectorate in maintaining education standards and the problems encountered: a case study of Nyandarua district, Central province, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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