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dc.contributor.advisorKuria, E. N.
dc.contributor.advisorOnyango C.
dc.contributor.authorKilungu, O. M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-13T08:47:29Z
dc.date.available2012-02-13T08:47:29Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/2674
dc.descriptionMaster of Science (Food, Nutrition and Dietetics) 112pg. 2004 The RA 601.K5en_US
dc.description.abstractA study on the hygienic and sanitary practices of vendors of street foods in Kayole and Dandora estates in Nairobi was carried out using a descriptive survey design. A sample size of 80 street food vendors each selling mutura, roasted maize. chips, mandazi, fruit salads, giiheri, fish and sausages in the two estates was selected. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and observation checklists. Sixtv street food consumers and two Public Health Officers were interviewed in the area of study. Data were analysed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), descriptive statistics such as means and frequencies were used, Chi Square and ttests were used to establish relationships between sex and hygienic and sanitary practices and differences between sex and income from street food vending. Information generated from the study showed that vendors had no training on food preparation skills. About 62% of the street vendors acquired preparation skills through observation while 33% were taught by their parents. The working surfaces used for preparation of raw foods were not washed regularly. Cooked foods were stored at ambient temperature in cupboards, plastic bowls and others were just left in the open uncovered. Vendors washed utensils using water in buckets and they were rinsed once, the rinse water was used severally before replacement. Eighty-five percent of the vendors had garbage and waste dirty beside the food stalls. Most of the vendors had no aprons, they handled food with their bare hands and their heads were not covered. When packaging the foods vendors uses air from their mouth to blow the polythene bags to open them before placing the food in them. Results showed that 7% of the consumers suffered from diarrhoea while 38% suffered from stomachaches due to the consumption of street foods. Sixtyfive percent of the consumers believed that the street food vendors did not observe proper hygiene and sanitation. Public Health Officers found it hard to inspect the vendors because no code of practice had been developed for street foods, by the authorities. They found the existing laws on food establishments inadequate for street vendors who operated under different circumstances. They indicated that street food industry is a new vocation, which provides job opportunities for urban dwellers hence the government should recognise it and give the necessary support for the improvement of the industry. The results of this study suggest that there is a need to establish street food centres by the councils and to train street food vendors on hygiene and sanitation aspects. In addition, there is a need to establish a code of practice for street food industry and empowerment of public health officers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectFood//Puplic health//Food Adulteration and inspectionen_US
dc.titleA Survey of Hygienic and Sanitary Practices of Vendors of Street Foods in Kayole And Dandora Estates, Nairobien_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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