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dc.contributor.authorMuraya, Martha Wanjiru
dc.contributor.authorNgare, Lazarus Kinyua
dc.contributor.authorGathungu, Geofrey King’ori
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-01T09:01:34Z
dc.date.available2023-08-01T09:01:34Z
dc.date.issued2020-03
dc.identifier.citationMuraya, M. W., Ngari, L.K., & Gathungu, G.K. (2020). Colonial Roots Of Food Shortage In Kenya: The Marginalizaion Of The Agikuyu Women’s Indigenous Knowledge System On Food Crop Production. International Journal of Liberal Arts and Social Science, 8(8), 14-24.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2307-924X
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/26476
dc.descriptionarticleen_US
dc.description.abstractSince pre-colonial period, the Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) on food crop production have played a significant role in enhancing the supply of food in the society. This paper examines the effects of marginalization of Agikuyu Women‟s Indigenous Knowledge Systems (AWIKS) on food supply during the colonial period in Kiambu County of Kenya. This is done to show how the colonial land alienation, commercialized agriculture, and forced labor policies undermined and neglected the AWIKS on food crop production, which contributed to lack of enough food supply in the households. The findings demonstrate that due to intensive land alienation, the Agikuyu women lacked enough productive land for cultivation which led to poor crop harvest, inadequate space for food storage facilities, and increased destruction and spoilage of food crops due to poor storage. The European commercial fast growing high yield food crops were more vulnerable to increased temperatures, low rainfall, and they required high farm inputs and mechanization which were not affordable by the Agikuyu women. The paper concludes that the integration of indigenous knowledge systems and western modern scientific agricultural knowledge systems on food crop production can be an effective way of ensuring food security.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherijlassen_US
dc.subjectColonialismen_US
dc.subjectWomenen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Knowledge Systemsen_US
dc.subjectcrop productionen_US
dc.subjectFood shortageen_US
dc.subjectmarginalizationen_US
dc.titleColonial Roots of Food Shortage in Kenya: The Marginalizaion of the Agikuyu Women’s Indigenous Knowledge System on Food Crop Productionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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