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dc.contributor.authorOmanyo, Peter Wanyama
dc.contributor.authorKeraka, Margaret
dc.contributor.authorWanyoike, Peter Kamau
dc.contributor.authorKikuvi, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorKebira, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-28T05:56:30Z
dc.date.available2023-07-28T05:56:30Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationOmanyo, P. W., Kebira, A., Keraka, M., Kikuvi, C., & Wanyoike, P. K. Factors Associated With Malaria, Intestinal Helminths, And Their Coinfection Among Pregnant Women Attending ANC In Kanduyi Sub-County, Kenya.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2394-4404
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/26445
dc.descriptionarticleen_US
dc.description.abstractMalaria and intestinal helminths are the most prevalent parasite diseases among children under five and pregnant women in impoverished countries, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). They can induce anemia in pregnant women, and this can have significant repercussions for the kid as well. When malaria and intestinal helminth infections coexist, the symptoms and pathology might be more severe. The study adopted mixed methods for data collection and 423 pregnant women were interviewed and data analyzed using SPSS version 26. Bivariate analysis was conducted to examine possible associations between predictor variables and independent variables. This was done using Pearson’s Chi Square. Association was considered significant when p-value is less than 0.05. Results indicated that Age (p=0.012), marital status (p=0.014), use of insect treated mosquito nets or repellents (p=0.033) and malaria chemoprophylaxis (p=0.0001) were significantly associated with malaria infection. Hand washing before meals (p=0.041) was significantly associated with intestinal helminths infection. Age (p=0.019), education level (p=0.017), hand washing before meals (p=0.031) and malaria chemoprophylaxis (p=0.0001) were significantly associated with coinfection. Malaria infection (p=0.015), intestinal helminths (p=0.039), and their coinfections (p=0.022) were significantly associated with anemia severity. In conclusion, the prevalence of anemia was high among pregnant women. The prevalence of malaria, intestinal helminths infection, and their coinfections was low. Malaria chemoprophylaxis, use of insect treated mosquito nets, and hand washing before meals was associated with malaria, intestinal helminth, and their coinfection.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIJIRASen_US
dc.subjectMalariaen_US
dc.subjectIntestinal helminthsen_US
dc.subjectAntenatal clinicen_US
dc.subjectpregnant womenen_US
dc.subjectAnaemiaen_US
dc.subjectcoinfectionsen_US
dc.titleFactors Associated with Malaria, Intestinal Helminths, and Their Coinfection among Pregnant Women Attending ANC in Kanduyi Sub-County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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