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dc.contributor.authorAsudi, George O.
dc.contributor.authorOmenge, Keziah M.
dc.contributor.authorPaulmann, Maria K.
dc.contributor.authorReichelt, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGrabe, Veit
dc.contributor.authorMith ̈ofer, Axel
dc.contributor.authorOelm ̈uller, Ralf
dc.contributor.authorFurch, Alexandra C. U.
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-25T08:13:42Z
dc.date.available2023-07-25T08:13:42Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationAsudi, G. O., Omenge, K. M., Paulmann, M. K., Reichelt, M., Grabe, V., Mithöfer, A., ... & Furch, A. C. (2021). The physiological and biochemical effects on Napier grass plants following Napier grass stunt phytoplasma infection. Phytopathology®, 111(4), 703-712.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-08-20-0357-R
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/26387
dc.descriptionarticleen_US
dc.description.abstractNapier grass stunt (NGS) phytoplasma, a phloem-limited bacterium, infects Napier grass leading to severe yield losses in East Africa. The infected plants are strongly inhibited in growth and biomass production. In this study, phytoplasma-induced morphological changes of the vascular system and physiological changes were analyzed and compared with uninfected plants. The study showed that the phytoplasmas are more abundant in source leaves and range from 103 bacteria/µg total DNA in infected roots to 106 in mature Napier grass leaves. Using microscopical, biochemical, and physiological tools, we demonstrated that the ultrastructure of the phloem and sieve elements is severely altered in the infected plants, which results in the reduction of both the mass flow and the translocation of photoassimilates in the infected leaves. The reduced transport rate inhibits the photochemistry of photosystem II in the infected plants, which is accompanied by loss of chloroplastic pigments in response to the phytoplasma infection stress eventually resulting in yellowing of diseased plants. The phytoplasma infection stress also causes imbalances in the levels of defense-related antioxidants, glutathione, ascorbic acid, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and—in particular—hydrogen peroxide. This study shows that the infection of NGS phytoplasma in the phloem of Napier grass has an impact on the primary metabolism and activates a ROS-dependent defense response.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAlexander von Humboldt-Stiftung, Germanyen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectbacterial pathogensen_US
dc.subjectetiologyen_US
dc.subjecthost parasite interactionsen_US
dc.subjectNapier grass stunt phytoplasmaen_US
dc.subjectpathogen detectionen_US
dc.subjectphloem mass flowen_US
dc.subjectphotoinhibitionen_US
dc.subjectplant immune responsesen_US
dc.subjectplant stress and abiotic disordersen_US
dc.subjectH2O2en_US
dc.titleThe Physiological and Biochemical Effects on Napier Grass Plants FollowingNapier Grass Stunt Phytoplasma Infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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