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dc.contributor.authorKiogora, Gitonga Frankline
dc.contributor.authorNjoroge, Jane
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-12T13:40:35Z
dc.date.available2023-07-12T13:40:35Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationGitonga, F. K., & Njoroge, J. (2021). HUMAN RESOURCE PRACTICES ON EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE: A CASE OF KENYA REVENUE AUTHORITY. International Research Journal of Business and Strategic Management, 3(3).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.irjp.org/index.php/irjbsm/article/view/73/93
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/26187
dc.descriptionArticleen_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this paper was to determine the effect of Human Resource activities on employee output in Government institutions-specifically Kenyan parastatals. The specific objectives were to find out how recruitment, training as well as employee work-life balance affect their performance derived from the (KRA) Kenya Revenue Authority. Resource-Based Theory was used in this study since it is most suitable having identified human resources as a key resource when it comes to continued institutional output and providing the firm with a competitive edge. The research employed descriptive research methodology and design to gather data from sampled population. The population of interest cut across all the staff members including the top management, middle management as well as the supporting staff of the Kenya Revenue Authority. From a targeted population of 220 Kenya Revenue Authority employees, a sample size of 73 interviewees was used of which is 30% of the support staff as well as a purposive selection of the top and middle management. The researcher employed a semi-structured questionnaire for data collection which was administered by the researcher in person. Data gathered was subjected to quantitative analysis through descriptive statistics. Inferential statistics were used in determining the direction, relationship, and strength of the association amongst the predictor variables and the response value. The study findings established that human resource practices do not significantly affect employee performance. The study findings also established that recruitment, training, and work-life balance practices do not have any significant association and relationship with employee performance. The study recommends to the policymakers at the Institute of Human Resource, other bodies, human resource practitioners, and consultants should not necessarily implement the human resource practices to augment employee performanceen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIRJBSMen_US
dc.subjectRecruitmenten_US
dc.subjectTrainingen_US
dc.subjectWork-Life Balanceen_US
dc.subjectEmployee Performanceen_US
dc.titleHuman Resource Practices on Employee Performance: A Case of Kenya Revenue Authorityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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