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dc.contributor.advisorDavid Kiiruen_US
dc.contributor.authorGacheri, Sarah Christine
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-20T10:41:07Z
dc.date.available2022-09-20T10:41:07Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/24266
dc.descriptionA Research Project Submitted to the School of Business in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Master of Business Administration (Human Resource Management) of Kenyatta University, April, 2022en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the present-day challenging environment of doing business, organizations have increased pressure for performing better as compared to before. Consequently, organizations are inspired towards creating better working schedules for their employees in order for them to increase and improve on their performances. Firms globally are laying plans on ways of boosting employees’ enhanced performance. Employee motivation by recognizing the benefit of work-life balance is gaining ground. To contribute to this never-ending debate, this study’s general objective was to examine the effects of flexible work arrangements on employee performance in the Vocational and Technical Training State Department in Nairobi County. The specific objectives were examining the effects of flexi time, job sharing, compressed work week, and telecommuting on employee performance. Signalling Theory, Work/Family Border Theory, Spill over and the Social Exchange Theory anchored this research. This study targeted all 935 employees drawn from the State Department and a sample size of 252 participants consisting of 5 directors, 13 managers and 234 staff was picked randomly. A questionnaire with both close ended and open-ended questions helped in gathering data. Validity and reliability of the data collection instrument was ensured. Qualitative data was analysed using content analysis. The researcher also ensured that those participating are going to be made aware of the study's objective and how confidential the gathered information would be. The study revealed that flexi time, job sharing, compressed work weeks, and telecommuting positively and significantly affected employee performance. The study concluded that in telecommuting allow employees to be productive, happier, and less stressed, whereas firms are gaining from good personnel retention, increased output, and lower absenteeism. Compressed work week arrangements give a simple solution for balancing high workload times in an organization as they occur. Through job sharing, more diverse talents and expertise are used, especially when they are complementary and through permitting flexible work hours. Companies can freely introduce agile working through alternating shift patterns and staggered hours to be more available to clients at all times including outside the work hours. The study recommended that the organization need to make sure pertinent information is easily and frequently communicated. The compressed work weeks should consider the distance workers travel as well as external circumstances such as family and other conditions that may limit the hours they can work, as starting early and ending late may cause challenges if the employee is traveling a significant distance. The organization should split the roles as effectively as possible in order to attain higher overall quality of performance, which will likely result in more motivated staff. The study recommended that to allow workers to operate remotely, some level of technology may be required. This can be accomplished through simple methods like an instant chat app or platform, telecommuting, or email.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectFlexible Work Arrangementsen_US
dc.subjectPerformanceen_US
dc.subjectEmployeesen_US
dc.subjectState Departmenten_US
dc.subjectVocational and Technical Trainingen_US
dc.subjectNairobi City Countyen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleFlexible Work Arrangements and Performance of Employees in the State Department Vocational and Technical Training in Nairobi City County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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