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dc.contributor.advisorEphantus Kabiruen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilliano, Ferdinand Wabwile
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-16T07:27:50Z
dc.date.available2022-09-16T07:27:50Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/24233
dc.descriptionA Research Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Master of Public Health (Monitoring and Evaluation) in the School of Public Health and Applied Human Sciences of Kenyatta Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractData collection, review, evaluation, and input on communicable and non-communicable diseases are all part of Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response. It allows medical personnel to identify and respond to these illnesses. Poor use of disease surveillance and response data has been described as a major contributor to rising infectious disease mortality and morbidity in developing countries like Kenya. This study looked at how public health facilities in Kiambu County used IDSR data to control infectious diseases. It investigated the overall utilization of IDSR data, proportion of health workers trained in IDSR, their level of knowledge about IDSR, and the health system factors that influence IDSR use. This was an analytical cross-sectional study carried out in public health care facilities, with main respondents being health care professionals who provided curative and preventive health services. The 108 health facilities were stratified as level II, level III, Level IV, and Level V. The number of respondents in each tier was chosen proportionately while selection from each facility was done randomly. The minimum sample size was 159. A questionnaire administered by a trained interviewer was used to collect data, which was then entered and analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 20. Chi-square test for independence was used to evaluate the associations between independent and dependent variables where the relative count frequencies were more than 5 while Fisher’s exact test was used where the relative count frequencies were less than 5. The predictors of IDSR data utilization were determined using regression analysis. The study was approved by Kenyatta University Ethical Review Committee and the authority to conduct the research requested from the National Council of Science, Technology, and Innovation. Permission was obtained from Kiambu County Health Authorities and informed consent sought from the respondents. The results show that there was inadequate utilization of IDSR data according to 64.9% of the respondents. Only 13.5% of health care workers had been adequately trained on IDSR while 20.6% had good knowledge of IDSR function. Accordingly, 54.6% of respondents had the opinion that there were inadequate essential supplies for IDSR. Fisher’s exact analysis shows that the respondent’s duration of practice (two-tailed, p=0.045) and level of knowledge (two-tailed, p=0.048) were associated with utilization of IDSR data. Logistic regression analysis illustrates that the level of knowledge (A.O. R=1.55, p=0.041) and Cadre of respondents (A.O. R=0.827, p=0.023) were predictors of utilization of IDSR data. The study concludes that utilization of IDSR data in the County is inadequate, and available data has not been used effectively to carry out disease surveillance functions. A large proportion of health care workers have not been adequately trained on IDSR for a significant proportion of the time. The health workers have average knowledge of IDSR function with the level of knowledge being a predictor of utilizing IDSR data for decision making. Financing for IDSR activities in the county is perceived to be insufficient. The study recommends that the health departments in both county and national governments should ensure that IDSR data is used to help make decisions about disease surveillance activities to effectively control infectious diseases. Routine and periodic staff trainings on IDSR should be implemented as well as provision of IDSR information materials to all health workers to enable them to boost knowledge on disease surveillance. The County should establish additional funding sources to support IDSR activities and improve the supply chain to ensure the availability of essential supplies for IDSR. Further research to assess the health system constraints that restrict the use of information derived from IDSR data in individual health facilities was recommended.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectUtilizationen_US
dc.subjectIntegrated Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectSurveillanceen_US
dc.subjectResponse Dataen_US
dc.subjectControllingen_US
dc.subjectInfectious Diseasesen_US
dc.subjectPublic Healthen_US
dc.subjectKiambu Countyen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleUtilization of Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response Data in Controlling Infectious Diseases Among Public Health Facilities in Kiambu County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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