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dc.contributor.advisorWilson Munaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMach Era, Martin Caleb
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-22T09:05:42Z
dc.date.available2022-08-22T09:05:42Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/24023
dc.descriptionA Research Project Submitted in Partial Fulfillment for the Degree of Master of Arts in Public Policy and Administration of Kenyatta University 2021en_US
dc.description.abstractMigori-Narok border remains one of the several volatile regions which have continued to experience persistent conflicts for decades. The conflicts have been all times tense that lives have been lost, property destroyed and close to one thousand people displaced. The effects of ADR mechanisms and how it has been used on conflict resolution is well documented in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, and Canada among others. In Kenya, ADR mechanisms have been used by the Meru‟s Njuri Ncheke and the Kikuyu‟s Council of elders. However, there is limited data on its effects and how it has been used on conflict resolution in the Migori-Narok border. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of ADR mechanisms in resolving recurring conflicts along the Migori-Narok border. The specific objectives of this study were: (i) to assess the effects of ADR methods used on conflict resolution in Migori-Narok border, (ii) to investigate the effects of ADR principles on conflict resolution in Migori-Narok border, and (iii) to examine the effects of acceptability of ADR mechanisms on conflict resolution in Migori-Narok border. The researcher adopted a descriptive survey design. The study is anchored on the theory of conflict transformation. The targeted population was 9,775 residents of the area around the Migori-Narok border. It employed both random and purposive sampling to sample 384 respondents. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were used to collect data. Participatory action research using focus group discussion, community dialogue, and key informant interviews were used to collect qualitative data, while self-administered interview questionnaires were used for quantitative data. Cronbach‟s alpha reliability coefficient was used to test the reliability of research instruments. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics like standard deviation, mean, percentages, and inferential statistics, while thematic analysis was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings revealed that there is a positive and significant correlation between ADR methods and conflict resolution at r = 0.608 and P = 0.000; is a positive and statistically significant correlation between ADR principles and conflict resolution at r = 0.044 and P = 0.005; and a positive and statistically significant correlation between the acceptability of the ADR mechanism and conflict resolution at r =0.337 and p = 0.000. Therefore, it is recommended that the government should make more efforts to create awareness about the importance of the communities understanding ADR methods to avoid taking the legal system approach which is costly and timeconsuming; ensure that the principles used in the ADR process are well documented and understood by the parties to a conflict to enhance parties‟ satisfaction, and carry more civic education to ensure that the residents understand and acknowledge ADR mechanisms as an important process for solving their disputes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectAlternative Dispute Resolutionen_US
dc.subjectResolution Mechanismsen_US
dc.subjectConflict Resolutionen_US
dc.subjectMigori-Narok Borderen_US
dc.subjectEffects of Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms on Conflict Resolution in Migori-Narok Border, Kenyaen_US
dc.titleEffects of Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms on Conflict Resolution in Migori-Narok Border, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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