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dc.contributor.advisorJudith Kimiyween_US
dc.contributor.advisorIrene Ogadaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHudson Lodenyoen_US
dc.contributor.authorObimbo, Matilda Makungu
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-18T09:42:38Z
dc.date.available2022-08-18T09:42:38Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/23975
dc.descriptionA Research Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Award of the Master of Science in Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Public Health and Applied Human Sciences, Kenyatta University, December, 2021en_US
dc.description.abstractHealthy dietary practices and physical activity reduces the risk to cardiovascular disease among women of reproductive age. Research has shown that traditional diets and increased physical activity is strongly associated with improved cardio-metabolic health. Minimal information exists on the association among dietary practices, physical activity and biomarkers for cardiovascular disease. This study aimed at establishing the dietary practices, physical activity and biomarkers for cardiovascular disease among women of reproductive age. The study adopted household cross-sectional design. A researcher administered questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-economic characteristics, saturated fat intake, nutrient intake, drivers of food choices, physical activity level among 250 women of reproductive age in Nairobi County. Body composition and blood pressure levels were established. Lipid profile level was established among 42 participants. Data from 24 hour dietary recall was analyzed using Nutri-survey software to determine amounts of nutrient intake consumed. Data from Rate Your Plate Food Frequency Questionnaire was used to determine saturated fat intake. Data from Food Choice Questionnaire was used to establish drivers of food choice. General Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure physical activity level. Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 22.0 was used to analyze data from both descriptive and inferential statistics, a p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. A third (34%) of the participants were employed in office work, accessed food from supermarket and fast food outlet (60.8%) and were of upper middle class (41.2%). Participants consumed more transitional diets than traditional diets and were physically inactive. Selected food types for saturated fat intake were; red meats (79.2%), red meats cuts high fat (54.8%), sausages (50.4%), chicken with skin (67.6%), deep fried chicken (67.6%), spreads (80%), cakes & cookies (75.6%). Alcohol was consumed by 44% of participants. The mean intake of all selected nutrients were above the recommended dietary reference value except for potassium (3377.35±1825.59) and magnesium (1973±22.48) were inadequate. The mean energy intake (2733.12±992.55) was above recommended dietary reference value of 2000 kilocalories. Drivers of food choice were sensory appeal (95.6%), mood (97.2%) and convenience (77.2%). Majority (81.2%) of the participants were physically inactive and had elevated LDL-C (45.2%), Low HDL-C (81%), obesity (41.6%), elevated WHR (63.2%), visceral fat (51.2%), high body fat percentage (82%), elevated SBP (33.2%) and DBP (45.6%). Chi-square test on dietary practices showed that transitional diets were significantly associated with biomarkers for elevated LDL-C (p≤0.001), SBP (p≤0.001), DBP (p=0.03), visceral fat (p=0.01). Physical inactivity was significantly associated with elevated Triglyceride (p=0.02). Socioeconomic characteristics (education level) (p≤0.001), occupation (p≤0.001), source of food (p≤0.001) and upper middle class (p=0.03) were significantly associated with biomarkers. The Socio-economic characteristics significantly associated with dietary practices included office work (p≤0.001) and bachelor’s degree education level (p=0.03). Regression analysis revealed that the odds of risk factors to cardiovascular disease were six (OR 6.60, 95% cl) times likely as predictors of biomarkers for cardiovascular disease. The researcher recommends that policy makers should enact and support policies that promote traditional diets and physical activity for improving cardio metabolic healthen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectDietary Practicesen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen_US
dc.subjectBiomarkersen_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectWomen of Reproductive Ageen_US
dc.subjectNairobi City Countyen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleDietary Practices, Physical Activity and Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Disease among Women of Reproductive Age in Nairobi City County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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