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dc.contributor.advisorPaul Obadeen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKamau Mburuen_US
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Chelangat Langat
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-21T07:55:05Z
dc.date.available2021-09-21T07:55:05Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/22557
dc.descriptionA thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfilment for the Award of Degree of Master of Environmental Science in the School of Environmental Studies of Kenyatta University. March, 2021en_US
dc.description.abstractForests in the world have immense importance ranging from productive to ecological services. Ecologically, forests are the world's largest water towers. They regulate hydrological cycles, pollution, and contribute to climate change mitigation. Despite these vital roles played by forests, deforestation and forest degradation continues, and this has reduced forest cover in the world from 4,128 billion ha in 1994 to 3,999 billion ha in 2015. Kenya’s closed canopy forest cover currently stands at about 7.4% of the total land area compared to 12.3% in Africa and 30.8% globally. Mau forest, which is the largest water tower in Kenya, has been destroyed and reduced by more than 25% since 1963. The study assessed the effects of human activities on the utilization and conservation of Kerisoi forest station, which is part of Mau forest. It was conducted in Kiptororo ward, Nakuru County. The objectives of the study were; i) to analyse the relationship between human activities and the loss of Kerisoi forest station vegetation cover over the period of 1989 to 2018, ii) to determine the effects of logging on the diversity of tree species in Kerisoi forest station reserve and iii) to evaluate the effectiveness of the existing conservation and protection measures in Kerisoi forest station reserve. The research applied a mixed-method research design which involved both descriptive and ecological surveys. In the descriptive survey, the sample size was 381 respondents; interviews were conducted only with the key informants. In the ecological survey, 10m by 10m quadrats were laid along 10 transect lines in the forest. In each quadrat, tree species were identified and recorded. Observation and photography were also made on various forest disturbances. Landsat images of 1989, 2002, 2010, and 2019 were used to compare land-use land-cover change. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS software. Qualitative data was analysed using structural techniques, establishing themes, patterns, relationships, and categories. The Shannon Wiener index of diversity was used to obtain the diversity of tree species in the forest. Landsat images were pre-processed and classified to come up with maps for comparison followed by accuracy assessment. The human activities identified in Kerisoi forest station included; logging, cattle grazing, and herbal medicine collection. Land use land cover change showed that natural forest was the most dominant land cover despite a reduction of 55.66 ha between 1989 and 2018 and an increase in the area under cropland by 1509.33 ha. 20 tree species belonging to 16 families were found in this study. The most abundant species was Podocarpus latifolia and the least was Cassipourea malosana, Olea capensis, and Teclea simplicifolia. The overall Shannon Wiener diversity index for Kerisoi forest station was 1.58. Conservation measures in place and known to the Kerisoi forest station respondents were plantation forest, law enforcement initiative, CFAs initiative, and public awareness. However, 34.9% of the respondents stated that they were not effective, contrary to 28.9% who stated that the conservation measures were very effective. The study concluded that the natural forest cover has reduced while cropland cover increased. The low diversity can be attributed to the effect of human activities besides non-effective conservation and protection measures. Consequently, measures such as fencing, forest restrictions, and banning all activities in the forest should be put in place to allow forest regeneration and recoveryen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.subjectEffectsen_US
dc.subjectHuman Activitiesen_US
dc.subjectUtilizationen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectKerisoi Forest Stationen_US
dc.subjectNakuru Countyen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.titleEffects of Human Activities on Utilization and Conservation of Kerisoi Forest Station, Nakuru County, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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