Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWayong’o, Stella N.
dc.contributor.authorMwangi, Francis M.
dc.contributor.authorWachira, Lucy-Joy M.
dc.contributor.authorRintaugu, Elijah G.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-28T12:30:42Z
dc.date.available2021-04-28T12:30:42Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationStella N. Wayong’o, Francis M. Mwangi, Lucy-Joy M. Wachira, Elijah G. Rintaugu. Emergency plans and safety regulations during physical education lessons in private primary schools in Kenya. The Russian Journal of Physical Education and Sport. 2019; 14(1): 88-98. DOI 10.14526/2070- 4798-2019-14-1-102-112en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/22028
dc.descriptionAn Article Published in The Russian Journal of Physical Education and Sporten_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: A quality physical education (PE) program offers the best opportunities to provide physical activity (PA) to all children and to acquire the skills and knowledge needed to establish and sustain a physically active lifestyle. The law imposes a legal duty on teachers and schools to take care of the safety and well-being of pupils under their care. The teacher has the duty to establish a safe and healthy environment by ensuring availability of emergency plans, proper condition of the equipment and apparatus as well as display of rules and regulations. The purpose of this study was to determine if emergency plan and safety regulations related to PE lessons were in place and if they were being observed in private primary schools in Nairobi City County, Kenya. Methods: Cross-sectional analytical research study design was used that engaged participants from 20 stratified and randomly selected primary private schools in five subcounties within Nairobi City County. A sample of 60 randomly selected pupils and 40 randomly selected physical education teachers from 20 proportionally, Data collection was Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data from PE teachers, Interview guides were used to collect information from pupils and Observation checklists were used to obtain first-hand information. The statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 23 was used to code and analyze the data. Chi square and Spearman’s Rho were used to test the relationship between different variables at a significant level of 0.05. Results: The study results indicate that a higher proportion of PE teachers reported to have had emergency programs (34 [85%]), and insurance covers (31 [77.5%]) in their schools. Chi Square analyses showed that there was significant association between types of school (in favor of high cost schools) and presence of emergency programs (X2=7.059; p = .029), availability of insurance covers (X2 =11.613; p = .003), wearing of PE kits during PE lessons (X2= 13.535; p < 0.001), and the attention given to the pupils during PE lessons (X2 = 53.860; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The type of private primary school in Nairobi City County determined the adherence to safety rules by both pupils and PE teachers. Not all private primary schools in Nairobi City County had proper emergency awareness programs for PE lessons. While most of high cost private primary schools are keen in implementation of emergency plans and safety regulations for PE lessons, most low and medium cost private primary schools are not, and may expose the pupils to higher risks. The ministry of education should enforce the safety requirements in schools more firmly across social-economic spectrum.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Russian Journal of Physical Education and Sporten_US
dc.subjectEmergency plansen_US
dc.subjectSafety rules and regulationsen_US
dc.subjectPhysical education lessonsen_US
dc.titleEmergency Plans and Safety Regulations during Physical Education Lessons in Private Primary Schools in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record