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dc.contributor.authorMusau, Paul M.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-26T07:42:01Z
dc.date.available2015-05-26T07:42:01Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationChemchemi Vol.2, No.1 2002en_US
dc.identifier.issn1563 - 1028
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/12673
dc.descriptionResearch Articleen_US
dc.description.abstractThepaper investigates the attitudes that Kenyans have towards Kiswahili and English, two languages that have official status in Kenya. It draws its data from letters to the editors of two popular Kenyan dailies, Daily Nation and Taifa Leo. The paper shows that those who argue for Kiswahili do so, principally for patriotic reasons. Kiswahili is seen as a 'neutral' language that is well suited tofoster national unity, regional integration, pride and cultural identity. On the other hand, arguments that are infavour of English are mainly utilitarian or functional in nature. English is seen as an important language for international communication, accessing science and technology, and a language of prestige without which it is impossible to climb the social ladder. The main conclusion that is drawn in the paper is that although the two languages appear to be incompetition, their roles are complementary. What is required is a language policy that defines the roleof each language. It is suggested that such a policy will maintain English while expanding the functional roles of Kiswahili in government administration and educationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.titleLanguage attitudes and their implications for language planning in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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