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dc.contributor.authorKamenju, J.W.
dc.contributor.authorMwangi, P. W.
dc.contributor.authorNjororai, W.W.S.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-21T09:29:09Z
dc.date.available2015-05-21T09:29:09Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationAfrican Journal of Applied Human Sciences, vol 1, iss 1 2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn2070 917x
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/12653
dc.descriptionArticleen_US
dc.description.abstractOne of the most common measurements of endurance fitness in exercise physiology is maximal oxygen uptake (V02max), which is an individual s capability for the uptake, transport and utilization of oxygen. The V02max determines an individual s capacity for work in a whole body activity such as rugby. This study investigated the aerobic capacity of Kenyan rugby players in 2005 Kenya cup league by their positions. The multi stage shuttle run test was used to predict individual players V02max of 90 players randomly selected from Impala, Harlequin and Nakuru rugby clubs at the beginning of the Kenya cup league competition and after eight weeks of training and competition. The study findings indicated that the backs had significantly higher V02max (44.4ml/kg/min at pretest and 43.9ml/kg/mi at posttest) than the forwards (40.8ml/kg/min at pretest and 40.9ml/kg/min at posttest). It is concluded that players in the two playing positions need training programme activities that are relevant to the specific role they play during the match.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.titleAerobic capacity among the rugby players in 2005 Kenya cup Leagueen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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