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dc.contributor.authorWekesa, Peter Wafula
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-03T09:27:17Z
dc.date.available2014-11-03T09:27:17Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationAfrica Development/Afrique et développement Vol.XXIX, No 4, 2004: 92-112en_US
dc.identifier.issn0850-3907
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ajol.info/index.php/ad/article/view/22208
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/11592
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses specifically on the Kenyan context to contest the foregoing position. Its argument rests on the axiom that whereas it has become normal in the writings on civil society, democratization and so on, to emphasize forms of cultural expressions that are perceived to be avowedly more understood in political circles than others, the space of popular music cannot be under-estimated. It is beneath the dialectics of production and consumption of this popular music with all its contradictions that the fertile intellectual arena on its potent marginalization could be resuscitated. The paper, addressing popular music from a historical perspective, takes into account its dynamic interplay as an aural percept, experience, social practice, individual and cultural expression and as a means of creatively adapting to perceived material conditions to reveal the complex and vital role of popular music as a system for the enactment and negotiation of emergent patterns of identity under conditions of pervasive social, political and economic changeen_US
dc.language.isofren_US
dc.publisherCODESRIAen_US
dc.titleThe Politics of Marginal Forms: Popular Music, Cultural Identity and Political Opposition in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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