Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMunga, Benson Mwangi
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-26T09:34:34Z
dc.date.available2014-06-26T09:34:34Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir-library.ku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/10157
dc.descriptionDepartment of Business Administration, 90p. 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed at investigating the relationship between non-financial rewards and teacher retention in private schools in Kirinyaga-South district. The study intended to identify the extent to which non-financial rewards influence retention of teachers in private schools. Non-financial rewards form part and parcel of a reward system. However, they are often overlooked as the financial rewards take centre-stage. The conceptual framework was aimed at trying to establish the relationship between recognition, work-life balance, personal development and workplace environment on one side, and teacher retention on the other side. Theoretical framework relevant for the study was Maslow’s theory, Equity theory, Herzberg’s two factors theory and Job Characteristics Model. The study adopted a descriptive survey design. The population of the study consisted of all private 45 E.C.D and 44 primary schools in Kirinyaga-South district. The study sample was 30 E.C.D and primary schools selected through stratified random sampling method. From these schools, 90 teachers were randomly selected to participate in the study as the sample size. A pilot study was conducted in order to validate the research instruments. Data was collected using questionnaires administered to teachers in the sampled schools by the researcher. The data collected was then analyzed using descriptive statistics. Quantitative data analysis was based on chi-square and correlation analysis and its procedures included frequencies, percentages and tables. Qualitative data was summarized in detailed narrative forms. The study established a positive relationship between non-financial rewards and teacher retention. Teachers agreed that employee recognition, personal development, work-life balance and workplace environment affect teacher retention. The study concluded that non-financial rewards were important in improving retention of teachers in private schools. Recommendations of the study included private schools coming up with a well stipulated non-financial rewards policy, embracing the total rewards philosophy, provision of conducive working conditions and reasonable job security. A few suggestions for further research were made. A similar extensive study should be carried out in another location so as to ascertain its ability for generalization to all private schools in the country, another one to determine the use of total rewards strategy in schools and another study to determine the role of trade unions in agitating for better terms and conditions of work for teachers in private schools.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenyatta Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between non-financial rewards and teacher retention in private schools in Kirinyaga- South districten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record